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Full text of "Page 6 Magazine Issue 03"

50 



J> 




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INCREDIBLE GRAPHICS ! 
EXPANDS INTO A FULL MICRO- 
COMPUTER.SUPPLIED COMPLETE 
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GAMES & SOFTWARE 
CLUB 



We are extending our library with the 
very latest Atari 400/800 games as they 
become available. This will Increase our 
comprehensive range of programs avail- 
able for hire to members at a most com- 
petitive rate. 

If members request a program we do 
not have and we consider it suitable we 
will endeavour to obtain it. 

Apply now and hire your 
FIRST TWO GAMES FREE. 



For full details send s.a.e. or phone any 
evening 7 p.m. -10 p.m. or at weekends. 

GAMES & SOFTWARE CLUB, 

35, Tilbury Road, 

Thorney Close, Sunderland, SR3 4PD 

Tel. 0783 286351 



Your friendly 
Professional 

Printer- 




YEARS 




1883-1983 

Birbeck and Sons Ltd, 

26-28 Fleet Street * Birmingham B31JY 

021-2364602 



I 




CONTENTS 



ISSUE 3 



MAY/JUNE 1983 



EDITORIAL , . - 4 

CALENDAR ». W. H. Staff 5 

NEWS 5 

LETTERS 6 

CRICKET MATHS Phil Griffin 7 

USER GROUPS/CONTACT 9 

ARCADE ACTION — REVIEWS Harvey Kong Tin 10 

CHARACTER REDEFINITION Michael Jackson 12 

CHARACTER GENERATION UTILITY Michael Jackson 14 

KEYBOARD TECHNIQUES Les Ellingham 18 

CHARACTER DESIGNER Paul Stevens 20 

SOFTWARE REVIEWS 21 

MASTER DIRECTORY Colin Friston 24 

FIRST STEPS - - 25 

CLUB CALL 26 

Cover ill lustration by Mike Roper 




Editor Les Ellingham 

Editorial Offices Tel. 0785 41153 

Printed by Birbeck & Sons Ltd. 
Published by ABACUS 



FWGE 6 1* i User* magazine *nd r»lit» entirely pn -eiders 

support in submitting. articles ind program*. The aim it to 

explore Atari computing through the exchange of information 
and knowledge and we cannot unfortunately pay for article* 
published. He hope you will gain satisfaction from seeing 
your uq?k py bl 1 «t»wcJ and in turn we hop* you will leant* from 
article* submitted by other deader* , 

Whilst we take whatever steps we can to ensure the accuracy 
:t articles ana progr- uns submitted and the content of 
advertisements, PAGE A cannot be held responsible for any 
•mors or claim* made by advertisers. 



e 
v 



Subscriptions to PAGE 6 are 
available from: 

PAGE 6, 1®, Underwood Close, 
Parkside, Stafford, England 

Subscriptions cover 6 issues 
(1 year) 

U.K. £ 4.00 

Europe— Airmail £ 7.00 

U.S.A.— Surface £ 7.00 

U.S.A.— Airmail £14.00 

Elsewhere — Surface ......£ 7.00 

Elsewhere™- Airmail £15.00 

Single copies (U.K. only) 70p 
inc. p. & p. 

Cheques etc. payable to 
ABACUS 

PAGE 6 is published bi-monthly 



ATARI is a registered trademark 
of Atari, Inc. All references 
should be so noted 



J 



I 



PAGE 6 



Editorial 



Issue 3 



WHERE ARE THE PROGRAMMERS? 

You all know that the UK glossy magazines 
feature very little about the Atari and one of the 
reasons put forward is that nobody sends them 
any material. Well, I am beginning to wonder 
whether that is true. Whilst much appreciation 
goes to those readers who have submitted 
articles and programs, the initial response 
seems to have dried up and we need more 
articles and programs for future issues. 

If it is true that most people do not submit 
Atarr programs to magazines, f wonder why? 
There could be two reasons. The first is that 
nobody writes any programs and the majority 
of owners spend all of their time playing 
games. If that is what you are doing, then put 
down your joystick read the articles and 
programs in this magazine and start writing 
some programs. It is not that difficult and you 
really don't know what you are missing. The 



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BELL & JONES 

39, QUEENS SQUARE, 

WEST BROMWJCH, 

Tel. 02 T -553 0820 



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real joy in owning a computer is in creating 
something of your own. Simple or complex it 
doesn't really matter. When you finish your first 
program you will experience great satisfaction 
The second reason could be that you look at 
some of the truly remarkable commercial 
software and think Wow! I could NEVER write 
anything like that! OK, so maybe you can't 
yet! So be content with what you can write. Pick 
up some ideas from magazines, improve them 
or write something similar. Pay attention to the 
little details of presentation and you can write a 
program, long or short, that you can be proud 
of Sit down now and start to write something. 
When you have finished, send it in to show 
other readers that we Atari owners can after all 
write programs. The magazine is totally 
dependent on your contributions. 

Let's hear from you. It's your magazine. 



ATARI SS8 

Games & Prog ram s 

Cassette 1 - Galaxy Trek 

Cassette 2- Hexapawn, Noughts & 
Crosses and Tower 
of Brahma 

Cassette 3- King .Magicians Caves 

Cassette 4- Maze, Robot Chase and 
Mugwump 

Cassette 5- Numerical Integration, 
Solving Simultaneous 
Equations, Best Fit Poly- 
nomial 

All cassettes £4,95 each 
SPECIAL OFFER-' 3 for £12.95 

5 for £19.95 

Mr. M^Ward, 9, St. Andrews Avenue, 
Crewe, Cheshire, CW2 6X1 






Issue 3 



PAGE 6 



Calendar 



W. H. Staff 



Want to know what day you were bom? Want 
to know what day your Grandad was born? 
Find out ail the dates you need with this 
calendar program. 

1 REM XS*X*****£****S#M*IH********* 

2 REM * CALENDAR f 

3 REM * by * 

4 REM £ N.H, STAFP r. 

5 REM &K*S***#$$UM****X*****£******* 
16 ? CHRf I 125) 

26 POKE 752,1: POKE. 7l2it92:P3K£ 718,1* 
2 

3$ CLR 

ab DIM DATE*U2) jDAVfvo) ,A*t. 1 l'» ,B< 2) 
56 POSITION 4 n 4: J "Enter tr^e V*»- you 
w i sh t G rev 1 ew " : PCS I T 1 ON 4 . 5 : ; " T yp e .' 
ear and press RETURN 
55 POSITION. 18,3: INPUT /EAR 
i@ X=INT<<YEAR+t6>/23+0.5> 
70 X2*CYEAR+16)/23 
38 LY-INT\ fEAR ■< 
99 LYS=YErtft/4 
100 DAYS 8 * \ YEAR* 265. 1 + 

119 WEEK3=DAtS/ 7 

120 WEEK* INT (DAYS/ 
130 DAY*WEEKS-WEEK 

149 D^ T Et~STR«-:0«'i ' 

150 DAV*=DATE* 

169 IF DAY*= , "fc ) r HLN DAY**"*. W?" 

1 78 IP DAV *= " . J 423 ,! THEN C- 1 

130 IP OAY*="0.235~" THEN C=2 

1 98 IF DAt*= - U . 4 235 " THEN C- 3 

208 IF DAY*="0.5714" THEN C=4 

218 IF DAYt="0,7j42" THEN 0=., 

228 IF DAY$=" 0.8571" THEN C=6 

233 IF DAY*== "0.9999" THEN C= " 

246 DATA "JANUARY" ,31, * FEBRUARY* .28 

, " MARCH " , 3 1 , " APR I L " , 3ft v ' MA r " 

,31, "JUNE" ,30 

250 DATA "JULY"' . 31 , 'AUGUST' ,31 

, " SEPTEMBER - , 30 , " OCT 03E R " , 3 1 , " NOVEMB 

ER |; ,30, "DECEMBER* ,31 

266 ? CHR*< 125) 

278 DIM P<7) ,H.6> 

230 L( 1> =9 : L <L 2) = 1 1 : L'-. 3> = 1 3 ; L < 4.? = 15 ; L l 5 

) = 1 7 : L t 6 > = 1 9 

2?0 p( i)«4iP<2)=?:P<3>xi4iPC4; = l9:Pt5) 

= 24;P(6)=29:P<7>=34 

300 DIM 3* CD 

310 E=1:D=D+C 

328 IF X=XZ THEN D=3 

338 IF LY=LYS THEN D=D-1 

340 FOR M^=l TO 12:READ A$,8 



News 



A new independent disk drive has just 
become available in the States. The RANiA 1000 
disk drive features switchable single/double 
density and has a few extra features such as 
automatic write protect and LED readout of disk 
contents- The really interesting news though is 
that it sells in the States at one-third less than 
the price of the Atari drive! Let's hope that it 
becomes available over here soon at that sort 
of price. 

A new book from Compute! that is an 
absolute must if you want to dig deeply into 
your Atari, is Mapping The Atari by Ian 
Chadwick. Seems to be in short supply at the 
moment but is well worth hunting down. 

Antic magazine is now monthly which is 
great news. Several people have written to ask 
where they can buy Antic, Analog and 
Compute! Try Calisto Computers in 
Birmingham or Gemini Electronics in 
Manchester, both of whom stock these 
magazines. If any other retailers keep them r let 
us know. 



350 i c L:=Lfb HMD 6=28 THEN B^2'= 
3&B POSITION 12,2: ~> A$; u " ; YEAR 

: 70 a f .q ; T [ jh ~ , 4 ; '"■ " _ 

":REM LINES ARE SHIFT M 

i'NLS 

'530 POSITION 3,6 :? "SUN HON TUE NED 

THU PR I SAT* 

3 C 8 POSITION 3,7V? ,k _. 

1- 

400 FOR Z'= t TO 3 
410 IF E*7 THEN E= 1 
420 IF D=3 THEN D= 1 



430 



<10 THEN GQ3UB 530 



440 IF Z>=*1@ THEN GOSUB 54 B 

450 D=DU;IF D*3 THEN E=E+ 1 

460 NEXT 2 

478 POSITION 4,21 !? "PRESS 'RETURN'" TO 

CON F I NUE " : POSITION 11,22:? " OR ' F ' TO 

FINISH " ;: INPUT Sf 
430 IF 3*=" " THEN GOTO 580 
490 IF S*="F" THEN GOTO 10 
596 E=1;IF M=12 THEN RUN 
518 ? CHR*( 125) jNEXT M 
528 END 

538 PCS IT I ON P ( D> ,L ( E) s ? CHR$ i 32) ; 2 : RE 
TURN 
548 POSITION P(D),L(E)»? 2iRETURN 






PAGE 6 



Issue 3 



Input 



Dear Sir, 

In Issue 2 you published 
Four In A Row. The more 
astute of your readers may 
have noticed the 'deliberate' 
mistake of the spurious line 
10045 RETURN. This prevents 
the text window being re- 
positioned on the screen and 
may cause it not to be dis- 
played on some TV's but 
otherwise it should work OK. 

I have been hearing a lot of 
comments about the quality 
of 48K upgrade boards for the 
Atari 400. I have had a 
MAPLIN board fitted at their 
Birmingham branch and this 
is working fine in spite of the 
use it gets at Club meetings. 
There appears to be a propa- 
ganda war being waged by 
suppliers of these boards. 
Perhaps your magazaine 
could publish an unbiased re- 
view of these, but what you 
could say apart from 'it works' 
or 'it doesn't work' may be of 
interest only to electronics ex- 
perts and not the normal user. 

Mike Aston, 
Wednesbury 



**The question of what up- 
grade is the best quality and! 
value is certainly one which 
most 400 owners will be 
interested in, As you say, 
some suppliers do tend to put 
down boards put out by com- 
petitors on the grounds that 
the chips used are likely to 
cause overheating. To get an 
expert review we would prob- 
ably have to ask one of the 
manufacturers and the views 



are unlikely to be unbiased. 
Perhaps more to the point 
would be to ask owners who 
have had upgrades what their 
experiences have been, if you 
have had your 400 upgraded 
to 48K write in and let us 
know. Who did you go to and 
why? Were you given any 
guarantee? Have you had any 
problems and if so what hap- 
pened? Did you get a repair or 
replacement without bother? 
We would also be pleased to 
hear from suppliers and re- 
tailers — what makes your 
board reliable? 



Dear Page 6, 

Great magazine. At last one 
just for Atari users. I have a 
couple of questions to ask. 

In the basic manual there is 
a description of RND. The var- 
iable or expression in 
parentheses following RND is 
said to be a dummy with no 
effect on the numbers 
returned. 

If this is the case, what 
effect will a or 1 in the 
parentheses have on the out- 
come of a random number as 
several programs seem to use 
these. An example from an 
actual program is 70 R=INT 
(0J+1: S=INT{RND(1}*16). 

Also, I have just had a 48K 
memory put in my 400 which 
seems to work OK, no pattern- 
ing problems. Is there some- 
thing I can type in to check 
that I have actually got a 48K 
memory in there working to 
its full extent? What would I 
expect to see printed on the 



screen with a 16K, 32K or 48K 
memory, assuming no pro- 
gram as such has been typed 
in? 

Mrs. E. E. Matthews, 
Walton-on-Thames 

**l have heard it said that a 
used as the variable produces 
a totally random number 
whilst a 1 prints the next 
number in a series of random 
numbers, though what truth 
there is in this I don't know, It 
may just be based on another 
machine's method of choos- 
ing random numbers. Does 
anyone know whether this is 
true? You can check your 
memory by typing FRE(0) 
after you power up (don't 
boot DOS if you have a disk 
drive). With 16K you should 
get 13326, with 32 K 29710, 
and with 48K 37902. The 
seeming discrepancy with 
48K is not due to your being 
done out of some memory 
but is because the Basic Cart- 
ridge overlays the memory 
between 40K and 48K, With 1 6 
or 32K this makes no differ- 
ence but with 48 K you do lose 
8K to Basic. Take out the cart- 
ridge and you have an extra 
8K although you can't then 
write programs in Basic. If 
you buy a 48K game however 
which boots without the Basic 
cartridge you are probably 
getting the full 48K use. 



Keep sending in you letters. 
Not only do they let us know 
what you want, they also 
spark off ideas for articles and 
programs. 



Issue 3 



PAGE 6 



Cricket Maths 

Phil Griffin 

Here's your chance to excercise your "grey 
cells' and perhaps earn yourself a place in the 
next England cricket team J 

Three levels of difficulty are included and the 
program randomly selects maths problems 
which, if answered correctly, can earn runs. The 
outcome of a correct answer is decided 
(randomly) by the computer and that means 
you may be 'caught' even though you 
answered tfie question correctly! If you answer 
incorrectly you are 'bowled out'. 

The program records the total runs scored 
and the number of wickets lost. On the loss of a 
wicket, the score at that point is recorded as 
'LAST WICKET' and the number of runs scored 
since the previous wicket was lost is recorded 
as 'LAST BATSMAN'. At the start of a further 
innings, the previous and current scores can be 
compared. 

For the technically minded, all graphics 
displays use modified display lists. The 
opening credits use Graphics 1 and 2, and the 
animation sequence is in Graphics 7. The 
'option' screen uses Graphics 1 and 2 while 
Graphics 0,1 and 2 are used for the scoreboard. 
An expanded text window is used for dealing 
with the question and answer routines and any 
'error' messages. Score details are "POKEd" 
directly to the screen using the 'memory 
mapped' screen locations. 

To ensure the best colour display, make sure 
you read all REM statements and use inverse 
video where indicated and use lower case as 
printed. 



i REM XX CRICKET MATHS K* 

2 REM XX BY £X 

3 REM *S PHIL GRIFFIN XX 

5 DATA B ,64, f ,64,4,64,20 ,£4,48,44,68,4 

4 , 6Q , 44 , 48 , 64 , 68 , 64 , 68 , 64 , 63 , 64 , 63 , 64 , 
68,68,68,80,68,64,69,0,68,0,80,8,64,0 

7 DATA 53,54,45, 182 r 47. 48, 40, 144,45,46 
,35, 121,47.43,46,144,53,54,45, 162,66,6 
1,47, 128,64,65,53, 188, 53^54, 45, 128 

8 DATA 60,61,47,121,144,162.193,243 
IB GOTO 5000 






?9 


REM 


30 


IF 


32 


POP 


89 


REM 


n 


FOR 


9? 


REM 



XX START CHECK Xf 
PEEK (53279)04 THEN RETURN 
s'GOTQ HUB 

M DELAY SUBROUTINE *i 
DLY-1 TO N:NEXT DLyjRETURN 
** BANNER SUBROUTINE XX 

180 POSITION 3,1s? *6;A$i.'D,D+13> :D=D+1 

:IF D=2? THEN D=l 

118 POKE 53279, 8s IF PEEK<53279)=5 THEN 
CLR sPOP s POP :G0TQ 140 

129 GOSUB 90 

13B RETURN 

3 40 DIM A*< 13) ,LI<3) ,R<3) ,HKTS<3> ,LBAT 

C 3) s A*= " * '■ '■ * A * '- A ■"'" " : FOR 1=1 TO 3 : L I 

CI>*BsNEXT I :GQT0 6000 

199 REM XX GRAPHICS SUBROUTINES M 

266 GOSUB 300 :A=h-3 Is GOSUB 300:A=A-31: 

GOSUB 300: POKE A-4 1,2: GOSUB 90: POKE A- 

4 1,32: GOSUB 100: POKE A-4i,0;A=A-2 

210 GOSUB 310:A=A+7?:GOSUB 310:RETURN 

220 GOSUB 390 :A-A-S1: GOSUB 30B:A=A-31 

230 POKE A, 70: GOSUB 90: POKE A, 63: POKE 

ft -40< 96: GOSUB 100: POKE A-48,44sP0KE A- 

3 1,70: GOSUB 98: RETURN 

300 SOUND 0,0, 0,0: SOUND 1,8, 6,0; POKE A 

,2:G0SUB 90: POKE A, 8: POKE A-40,32sGO3U 

B J 00 : POKE A-40 , : RETURN 

3 1 8 SOUND 0,0,0,0: SOUND 1 

, 2 : GOSUB 90 : POKE A . : POKE 

B lBBsPQKE A+48,0:RETURN 

1000 REM 3* SET UP SCOREBOARD XX 

10 19 GRAPHICS hSETCOLOR 2, 2 , 2 :DL=PEEK 

(560 '>+256* PEEK ("561/ :P0KE DL+3,71:P0KE 

DLf8,2:POKE Dl+9.2 

1012 POKE DL+12,7:P0KE DL+24,2 

10 15 POSITION 3,0:? 46; ,h cricket maths 

' :REM ALL INVERSE 

3020 POSITION 0,3:? #6;" 

rung by answer inq these 
UERSE 



,0,0,0:POKE A 
H+40,32:GOSU 



Try to score 

" : REM ALL IN 



1030 


POSITION 


,5:? 


M6' y " m 


aths 


problems 




":REM ALL IN 


UERSE 






1040 


POSITION e 


9s? 


*I6: "runs s 000 wick 


etsrJ 


30" 






1050 


POSITION 2, 


13 s-; 


' «6riast wicKet:0 


00":! 


POSITION 2,. 


15:? 


tt6;"last batsman s9 


06* 








1655 


TL=PEEK(3S; 


+256SPEEK(89) 


1060 


POSITION 2, 


13:' 


#6; AS sFOR 1=0 TO 


2:P0KE TL+375+I, 


LI (I 


+ i):NEXT I 


1070 


FOR 1=1 TO 


3: Re 


I) = 16sWKTS(I) = 16:L 


BAT<D = 16f.NEXT I 






1080 


POKE 752,1: 


GOSUB 7018 


1090 


TRAP 10000 






1100 


REM m QUESTION 


GENERATOR XX 


niB 


? CKR*C125> 


:IF 


RND( 1)>0.5 THEN 2» 


00 






over 



8 



PAGE 6 



Issue 3 



1128 A=INT<RND<1>KP1 + R1> :B=INT<RND( 1)S 

P2+R2)iIF RND(1)>6.5 THEN 1208 

1130 C=A*BiPOSITION 2,21:? *6;A; H F' ;B; 

"=? " sGOTO 4000 

120@ D=A*B:C=A:A=D;POSITION 2,21:^ #6i 



A:"/";B:-=? 



:G0TO 4000 



2800 A=INT<RNDn>KP3+R3) :B"INT<RMK 1>* 

P3+R3):IF RND(1)>0.5 THEN 2100 

2810 C=A+B: POSITION 2,21:? «4fA? I, +" $B; 

M =? ":GOTO 4000 

2100 IF A)B THEN C=A-B:POSITION 2,21:? 

**5Ai"-"iBj"«? ":GOTO 4880 
2110 C=B-A: POSITION 2,21:? *6;B ; " -" ;A j 
11 =? "iGOTQ 4088 
2??? REM *S CORRECT ANSWER ** 
3080 FOR I =-20 TO 0:X=I:FOR Z=0 TO 3:S 
OUND Z,ABS<X) ,1«,7iX=X43iNEXT ZiNEXT I 
3002 FOR X-d TO STEP -l:FOR Z=9 TO 3 
: SOUND Z,8 s 18,XtNEXT I :NEXT X:FOR 1=1 
TO 108:NEXT I 
3805 POSITION 2,21 J? U j " '" : ? 

CHR*(125:> :? "HELL HIT " ; 

3086 FOR 1=1 TO 200: NEXT I: GOTO 3006+ ( 

INTiRNDf i)*6+l)£10) 

3810 ? "FOR 6 RUNS,":RC3>=R(3>+6:lB*T< 

3)=LBAT(3)+6:G0T0 3208 

3020 ? "FOR 4 RUNS . " : R « 3) = R ( 3) ♦ 4 : LBAT ( 

3>=LBAT(3^+4:60TO 3200 

3038 ? "FOR 2 RUNS. ,r :R(3)=R(3)*2sLBAT( 

3)=LBAT<3)+2:G0T0 3208 

3840 ? "FOR 1 RUN," :R(3>=R(3) + J: LBAT' 3 

)=LBAT£.3> + l:GOTO 3288 

3650 ? "FOR 3 RUNS . " ; R ( 3) =R < 3) + 3 : LBAT < 

3)=LBAT<3>+3sG0TO 3200 

3068 ? "BUT YOU'VE BEEN CAUGHT !": GOSUB 

9800:GOTO 4580 
3199 REM M SCORE UPDATE Ss 
3280 IF RC3>>25 THEN R<3)=R(3) -10:R<2) 
=R<2) + 1 

3210 IF R(2>=26 THEN RC2>=R( 2) - 10 :Rt i> 
=R(1>+1 

3220 IF L8AT(3)>25 THEN LBAT < 3.) =UBAT( 3 
>-10iLBAT(2>=LBAT(2>+1 
3238 IF LBAT < 2) =26 THEN LBAT (2) =tBATt. 2 
>"10:LBATa>=LBAT( 1) + 1 
3240 FOR 2=8 TO 2s POKE TL+ 135+2 ,R<2+ 1) 
:NEXT ZsFOR 1 = 1 TO 458 :NE:xT I : GOTO 111 


3999 REM ** ANSNER ROUTINE ** 

4000 POKE 16, 64: POKE 53774, 64 : POKE 7^4 
,255s INPUT DsIF PEEK<TL+522>031 THEN 

3000 

4082 IF C=D THEN GOTO 3680 

4005 GOSUB 9008 

4009 REM S* WRONG ANSWER M 

4018 ? CHR$C125)e- j "WRONG- I'M AFRAID Y 

OU'ME BEEN BOWLED.":? "THE ANSWER HAS 

11 ;C:".":FOR 1=1 TO 500 -sNEXT I 

4500 WKTS(3)=WKTS(3)*lfIF WKTS<3> = 26 T 

HEN NKTS( 3> = 16; WKT S ( 2> = 1 7 



4520 POKE TL+193.WKTS(2) :POKE TL+1??,N 
KTS(3):F0R Z=8 TO 2:P0KE TL+274+Z,R<Z+ 
1) tPOKE TL+315+2,LBATCZ*i) sNEXT Z 
4530 FOR 2=1 TO 3:LBATCZ)= 16:NEXT ZsFO 
R 1=1 TO 45B:NEXT I : POSITION 2,21:? #6 

. H H 

| 

4548 IF WKTS(3) = 17 AND WKTS(2) = 17 THEN 

4550 
4545 GOTO 1118 

4558 - J CHRS(125):? " THAT'S IT' YOU 

'RE ALL OUT! M ' 

4555 ■> " PRESS START FOR ANOTHER INNI 

NGS/'iREpt START IN INVERSE 

45o8 POKE 53279,8: IF PEEKC53279) <>6 TH 

EN 4560' 

457B A$= p U*t innings:"! FOR J=l TO 3:L 

[(I)=*<I) :NEXT I :G0TO 6000 

5080 REM *£ SPLIT SCREEN GRAPHICS S* 

50 10 GRAPHICS 23:DL=PEEK(560)+256*PEEK 

(561) :POKE DL+3,70:FOR Z=6 TO 14 STEP 

2: POKE DL+Z,7:POKE DL+Z+ 1 ,6jNEXT Z 

58 15 POKE DL+16,7 

50 20 POKE DL+ 64, PEEK (560i : rqkE DL+65,P 

EEK^5c-l) ;PDKE 87, 1 

5O30 REM ** OPENING CREDITS ** 

5640 DIM A*(47) :N=f0 

504v REM ALL tt IN NEXT TWO LINES IN EN 

UERSE 

5050 POSITION 2, #;? M\ "tMtttfttMtttfltiWttHItt 

##*: POSITION 2.2:' 1 %6\ "tt4ttt#ti##tt#tttt#titHi 

tt" : SETCOLOP 3 , J 5 , 6 : SET COLOR 0,3,6 

5860 POSITION 2.1;? #6; r # 

r 

5878 rtt=" cricket maths 



5879 REM bv 
5@30 POSITION 



IN NEXT LINE IN IMMERSE 

9,4:? tt6; "by": POSIT I ON 



:POSITI0 
INVERSE 



,6:? *6:"P.A. GRIFFIN CC. 19833 

N 5,3:? #6 :" ********** ": REM * 

5889 REM press' and to play' IN NEXT 

LINE IN INVERSE 
5098 POSITION 8,10:? K6;' press' select' 
to play" 

5108 REM ** GRAPHICS MOVEMENTS ** 
5105 TL=PEEK<88)+256*PEEK<a9) 
5110 FOR 2=446 TO 1166 STEP 40 : READ A, 
6: POKE TL+Z.A:POKE TL+Z+ 1 ,B:NEXT 2:P0K 
E TL+1205,1:REM ** WICKETS ** 
5120 0=l:SOUND ,255, 10, 15:SOUND 
,16, 15sA=TL+1113:GOSUB 208: SOUND 
, 10 . 15; SOUND 1 ,255, 10 , 15 :A=TL+ 1 107 
5125 GOSUB 208: SOUND .255 , 10 , 15 s SOUND 
1,255.10, 15:A=TL+- 1101: GOSUB 2@0;SOUND 
8,255, 10, 15: SOUND 1,255,10,15 
5130 A=TL+ 1895: GOSUB 286: SOUND 8,255,1 

SOUND 1 ,255 . 10 , 15:A»TL± 1089 ; GOSUB 

SOUND 8, 15U,12, 10 

FOR 2=436 TO 566 STEP 48;POKE TL+ 



1,255 

0,255 



0, 15 

220 
5140 

Z,0iNEXT Z:FOR Z=606 TO 
OKE TL+Z,64:NEXT Z:POKE 



t 






1086 STEP 40 sP 
TL+- 1046.65 



Issue 3 



PAGE 6 



5156 SOUND 0,0,0,«!FOR Z*l TO 30;GOSUB 
IflBiFOR J=l TO IdsNEXT J:NEXT 2 

5160 RESTORE :GOTQ 5110 

5999 REM ** OPTION ROUTINE ** 

40B0 GRAPHICS i7B&L=PEEK<568>+254*PEEK 

(541) :FOR Z=0 TO 4iPOKE DL+1 1 + Z i?:NEXT 

Z 
696? REM NEXT THREE LINES IN INVERSE E 
XCEPT ■'option'' AND -'start' 
i@10 POSITION 2,2 r j 116 1 "press- option'* 
or" iPOSITION 2,1 J? *4i "difficulty leve 
1" 

6020 POSITION 3,6!? #6;" J : EASY" :POSI 
TION 3, Si? tt6; lh 2 : MODERATE" POSITION 
3, 101? tt6;"3 : HARD" 

6830 POSITION 8,14i? #6; "press' star t ■ t 
o begin" 

6100 TL=PEEK(88>+254*PEEK(89) SPOKE TL+ 
216,0:POKE TL+ 136,?4:P 1=1 1 :R1=2 :P2= 1 1: 
R2=2;P3=29;R3=2 

6105 FOR 1=1 TO 100SNEXT I : POKE 53279. 
8 

6113 IF PEEK-: 53279) O 3 THEN GOSUB 80:6 
0T0 6110 

6 12@ POKE TL+ 136,0; POKE TL+ 1?4,?4:P1= 1 
?:P2=8:P3=96jR3=5:FQR 1=1 TO 108 :NEXT 
I: POKE 53279,8 

6130 IF PEEK< 53279)03 THEN GOSUB 80:0 
OTO 6130 

6148 POKE TL+ 176,0: POKE TL+216»74:P1=9 
9iP2*ll!P3=446;R3^35sF0R 1-1 TO 100 :NE 
XT 1:P0KE 53279,3 



6150 IF PEEK<5327?K>3 THEN GOSUB 30:0 

OTO 6150 

>i-l=.0 GOTO 6103 

7000 REM *'£ MUSIC ROUTINE fJi 

7010 RESTORE 7sN-100 

7020 FOR 1=1 TO 9:READ A,B,C,D:SOUND 9 

,h, 14,6sS0UND 1,B, 14,6:SGUND 2, C, 14,6: 

SO WD 3,0,14, 6 : GOSUB 98 : NEXT I 

7030 FOR 1=1 TO 4; READ A: SOUND 3, A, 14, 

6:G0SUB 90 rNEXT I :W- 30 s GOSUB 9% 

704@ FOR [*4 TO 8 STEP -2:S0UND 0,60,1 

4,1s SOUND 1 ,61 , 14, 1 j SOUND 2,47, 14,1 tSO 

UN$ 3,243, 14,1 sMEXT I 

7950 FOR 1=1 TO 200:NEXT I s RETURN 

?$?? REM X* LOST ? ROUTINE U 

3000 FOR 2=3 TO 2&: SOUND 0,25,2,8sNEXT 

ZsSOUND 0,0,0,0 
30 10 ? CHR*U25>s? "SOMEHOW YOU'VE LOS 
T THE INPUT PROMPT':? " -PLEASE INPUT 

YOUR ANSWER AGAIN 1 ■ 
8020 FOR 1=] TO 750:NEXT I:? " } " s GOTO 

4000 

3999 REM «* WRONG ANSWER SOUND ** 
9009 FOR 2=1 TO 5:S0UND 2 ,2*28 , 12,9 :F0 
P 1=1 TO 40JNEXT I : SOUND 0,0, 0,8: FOR I 

=1 TO 25: NEXT I : NEXT 2: RET URN 

9999 REM *i TRAP ROUTINE K* 

10000 FOR 2*1 TO 20:SOUND 0,25,2,S:NEX 
T Z: SOUND 0,0.0,0 

10005 ? CHR*(125)s? " PLEASE INPUT 

ONLt' NUMBERS":^ " IN YOUR AN 

3WER Mt ;F0R 1=1 TO 650 : NEXT I :TRAP 100 
I0CU0 ? C-HR*'; 125:.' : GOTO 4006 



User Groups/Contact 



If you run a User Group or would like to get in 
touch with other Atari owners, let us know and 
we will happily publish details. 

See Issue 2 for User Groups in MERSEYSIDE, 
EDINBURGH and PRESTON. Meanwhile, here 
are a few more contacts. 

NORTH WALES.— G.P. Video Systems of 
Wrexham have just started up a User Group. 
No details yet of meeting place or time. Get in 
touch with 



NORWICH.— Ken and Sherry Ward are trying to 
get some people together to form a local User 
Group. If you live in or near Norwich, get in 
touch. 

KEN & SHERRY WARD, 

45, COLEBURN ROAD, 

LAKENHAM, 

NORWICH 

TeL 0603 661149 

HULL. — Harvey Kong Tin would like to meet 
anyone locally to sort out some problems and 
learn some more. Write or 'phone. 



G,P. VIDEO SYSTEMS, 

36, HENBLOS STREET, 

WREXHAM 

Tel. 0978 264451 



HARVEY KONG TIN, 

546, HOLDERNESS ROAD, 

HULL, HU9 3ES 

TeL HULL 791094 



10 



PAGE 6 



Issue 3 



ARCADE ACTION Reviews 



Three more of the classic arcade games are 
now available for your Atari 400/800. They are 
reviewed here for us by reader HARVEY KONG 
TIN who appears to be an avid arcade gamer. 

DEFENDER 



16K ROM 



ATARI 



1/2 PLAYERS 



The Arcade game is at last available for the 
Atari 400/800 and plays very much like the 
arcade — fast action and furious enemies. 

Like Airstrike the game is best played with 
your computer on the floor, so that your foot 
controls the very important space bar which in 
this case controls your life-saving smart 
bombs. With this arrangement, a very 
responsive joystick (the Wrco Command 
Control is excellent) and persevered endurance, 
your scores will climb, For those unfamiliar 
with this highly-rated game — your spacecraft 
moves in four directions with unlimited fire 
power, your aim is to protect the hu ma noids on 
a planetoid landscape. There are five types of 
enemy craft to become familiar with, which you 
will need to do to climb to 100,000 points. A 
radar screen prepares you for any oncoming 
hazards as you pass over the scrolling 
landscape. Smart bombs obliterate any enemy 
on the screen except for their fire. You start off 
with three and earn an extra one for each 
10,000 points. 

The sound didn't sound like the arcade 
version at first, but after a while it grows on you 
and starts sounding familiar. While the 
graphics are not sharply defined (but equal to 
the worst quality arcade machine) the action 
and pace is there for anyone hardy enough to 
enjoy it. 

This cartridge is for fans who enjoy defender 
who are willing to forgive Atari for being a bit 
rushed with it. 



GORF 

16KROM/DISK 



ROKLAN 



l/2 PLAYERS 



A quality arcade game from Roklan. This 
game gives you four different missions to go 
through. 

The first, Astro Battles, is a mini version of 
Space Invaders. Even if you were lousy with 
Space Invaders, you can easily learn to survive 
this mission and continue with the others. The 
second, Laser Attack, reminds me of Galaxian 
in a kamikaze sort of way — two ships fire 
lasers and the rest ram you! 

The third mission. Space Warp, requires you 
to shoot Gorfs and Fighters as they emerge 
from a vortex. The fourth and final mission of 
each round is Flag Ship, where you must first 
blast through a force field arc to shoot at the 
big ship. Just like Star Wars, you are aiming for 
a sensitive internal reactor vent. However, 
defensive fireballs are coming at you and 
rebounds of your own shots can hit you. With 
any ships remaining you can go through all the 
hazards again — faster and faster, 

The graphics and sound are very well 
programmed and the game should suit those 
fond of arcade games. The four separate 
missions add variety and makes Gorf 
somewhat more challenging than the one 
screen games. 

GALAXIAN 



16K ROM 



ATARI 



1/2 PLAYERS 



Another direct translation of a popular arcade 
game. All of the elements of Galaxian are there. 
An overhead fleet of enemy spaceships in 
formation which peel off to attack your ship 
below and, if they survive your fire, return to 
formation. 



Issue 3 



PAGE 6 



11 



You need to be firing constantly, once to get 
your gun ready and once to fire a shot. You 
have a choice of different fevels to start at — 
even a beginner's level where they don't fire 
back. The graphics are well handled apart from 
the missing bright red of enemy ships. The 
starfield is effective and stays in the 
background. The sound effects are poor though 
and tend to irritate rather than add to the game. 

There are differences to the arcade version. 
You have incredible horizontal speed enabling 
you to duck missiles quickly and there are no 
ships that home in on you in wild parabolic 
paths. Overall the cartridge doesn't match up 
well with the arcade game and I guess it's a 
matter of taste if you find this game very 
playable. I would recommend trying it out 
before buying. 

A good question to end with would be — Will 
Atari produce a version of Galaga? The 
graphics and sound would have to be nothing 
short of superb to bring this cute invader game 
into the home for the Atari owner. 

Happy Gaming' HARVEY KONG TIN, 




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PAGE 6 



Issue 3 






Character Redefinition 



Michael Jackson 

The Atari computer is truly an electronic 
marvel which offers fabulous graphics and 
sounds. It is for these qualities the Atari Home 
Computers are best known. There is, however, 
another feature that the Atari possesses which, 
when used to best effect, can be iust as stun- 
ning—if not more so — than all those very 
impressive graphics modes. 

How would you like Roman-style numerals 
instead of the normal numbers? Or perhaps 
some artistic script writing (like the writing you 
see in Scott Adams Adventures!)? What about 
some trees or perhaps grass? Some mountains 
might be nice! How can all this be done? It's 
called character redefinition. 

Probably the best place to start understand- 
ing the principles of character redefinition is to 
examine what makes up a single character in 
the first place. Each character can be mapped 
on an 8 x 8 grid which represents 8 bytes of 
memory inside the computer. A character is 
best thought of as being composed of 8 
layers^ see figure 1 — with each layer repre- 
senting a consecutive address in memory. 

As you can see from figure 1, the shape of the 
character is decided by which 'bits' are filled in 
(on) and which are not (off) in each layer. 




This image is stored in memory and the value 
stored at each memory address (representing 
each layer) is determined by the placement of 
the 'on' bits. Let's suppose that layer 1 starts at 
address 30000. To create the shape in figure 1 



If this is the case, then two things must be 
done. First the whole Atari character set must 
be copied over into the spare memory pages 
you have selected and then selective areas that 



you would POKE 30000,0;30Q01,24;30002,60 
and so on. Address 30008 would represent the 
first layer of another character. 

Now you know the basic principle of creating 
a character, let's get down to practicalities. 

WHERE TO STORE YOUR CHARACTER DATA | 

The memory of your Atari is grouped 
together in lots of 256 address locations. Each 
group or lot of memory is referred to as a 

'page'. 

You must decide which memory page to start 
storing your character set data. Care must be 
taken to avoid occupying memory which may 
be taken by your Basic program. The bigger 
your Basic program (which needs your custom 
character set), the higher up in memory you 
must go to store your character data, i.e. the 
page number must be bigger. I have found that 
page 120 (on a 32K machine) works well 
enough for me. With a page number of 120, this 
means that the starting address for your 
custom set is 120x256 which equals 30720. Try 
poking 756,120. If the screen goes blank, this 
means that there is nothing in that area ot 
memory and that you can store your character 
data there. It is wise to do this while you have 
the program which is going to use your 
character set already in memory. If the screen 

is full of weird characters then you must try a 

higher page, 

SELECTING CERTAIN CHARACTERS ONLY 

Up till now I have assumed that you want to 
redefine every keystroke character or will only 
use those characters that you have redefined. 
Sometimes, however, you may want to change 
only one or two characters and keep the rest 
the same as the Atari set. For example, if you 
have a business program, you will probably 
want a '£' sign rather than the '$' signl Perhaps 
a proper division sign instead of T. 



Issue 3 



PAGE 6 



13 



relate to the character/keystroke you want to 
change must be POKED with new values. In 
case you're thinking of giving up, I should add 
that the CHARACTER GENERATION UTILITY 
program does everything for you, but I will 
explain it here so you can understand the 
mechanics better. 

The following short program would deal with 
the first task: 



10 FOR 1=0 TO 11023: POKE 
1 20*256+ l,PEEK(224*256+l) : 



NEXT I 



Page number 224, by the way, is the page 
which the computer uses to store its permanent 
character set This page cannot be changed 
which is why you need to copy the character set 
to another location. As you will see, this 
program simply peeks what is in page 224 and 
then copies it into page 120, If you want to 
actually see the copying process taking place, 
then switch off the computer and re-enter the 
program but with Line 5 POKE 756,120. Run it. 
Weird, isn't it? 

The second task, picking out that group of 8 
memory addresses for your particular 
character, requires consultation of your Atari 
Basic Reference Manual at page 55. Here you 
will find a table which details the relative 
positions of characters. Let us suppose you 
want to poke data that creates a '£' sign into the 
area of memory that currently holds the $ sign. 
Consider the following program, which does 
this. 

10 FOR l=0TO7:READA 

20 POKE 120*256+4*8+!,A 

30 NEXT I 

40 DATA 28,32,32 r 32, 120,32,98, 126 

Let's see now. Line 10 reads each of your 
data values. There are 8 values — one for each 
layer of your character. In this case it is a pound 
sign. Line 20 identifies the starting point of your 
character set (120*256), then it calculates the 
first of the 8 addresses you want (+4*8) — 
where 4 is the internal number representing 
the $ sign (see page 55 of your manual) and 8 



since there are 8 memory addresses involved 
to make up each character. Line 30 repeats the 
process 8 times and Line 40 holds your data. 

The utility program actually writes these 
programs for each key you choose for each 
custom character you create! 

Once you have stored the values of your new 
character set into memory, you will want to see 
the fruits of your labour on the screen. POKE 
756 with the page number you are using, in this 
case it is 120, and voifa! 

NOTE. Entering a new Graphics command 
returns you to the Atari standard character set. 
You must POKE 756,120 {or whatever page you 
are using) straight after a new Graphics 
command. A GOSUB may help you here. 

See next page for program 







FOR ATARI 4O0/300 



Cassette ACJ-Attick Force: Scramble type program 
with nine stages rockets and fuel dumps (3210. 
Xasact:Pacman type prolan in which you fill in the 
naze whilst being chased by nasty monsters ()40 . 

Cassette AC2-Qu«ator:In this reaT time adventure 
you have to rescue your companion who is trapped on 
the top level of a 388 room alien conple* UdK), 
Antt Hattersguide the android around the Anti 
Hatter wells. 

Cassette AC3-tfoth:Battte with the Iiperial Hal Iters 
and cruiser? as in The Empire Strikes 
BacK, Scrolling landscape In PM graphics (IdfO, 
Hanard:Steer yog car along the narrowing 

road .Avoid the rocks and roadside to gain 
points.Hun over dogs for bonuses (MK>, 

Caswtttes 13.95 each + Tflp PfcP.Ont/ one postage 
charge for 1 or more cassettes, PI ease state memory 
capacity. 



14 



PAGE 6 



Issue 3 



Character Generation Utility 



Michael Jackson 



This program runs on an Atari 400/800 com- 
puter with a minimum of 32K RAM. 

The Utility allows the user 3 functions, 

1) MANUAL — This status allows the user to 
create his own character by filling in any box on 
the grid. 

2) DATA INPUT — Allows the user to input 
Data values and see what they represent in 
character form. This is particularly useful when 
analysing other people's character data. 

3) CHARACTER INPUT — This status 
examines an existing character in the set. 

The program always returns to MANUAL 
after any status and therefore allows you to 
improve upon or otherwise amend a character. 
For example, if The character you wish to create 
looks a bit like a T then you can use the 
CHARACTER INPUT status to get the f on the 
grid and then use MANUAL to change it 
slightly. 

Your new character ON THE GRID will only 
be registered in the program's memory if you 
press 'G' for GENERATE. Please see the com- 
mand list. 

COMMAND LIST 

CH — Allows you to enter a character on the 
grid. At the prompt, press the appropriate key 
and RETURN. 

CL — Clears the grid. 

D — Allows you to enter DATA and see the 
character representation. At the prompt, enter 8 
values, hitting RETURN after each. 

E — Puts the program in ERASE mode. Use to 
erase points on the grid. 

F — FILL mode. Use to plot points on the grid. 

G_ Commits whatever is on the grid to 
memory. (Even a blank grid,) 



L| — Allows key choice for each character 
created. Follow the prompts. This key must 
always be used before you can save any 
characters to tape, 

Lx — Where x is the layer number of the grid. 
To fill points on layer 2 of the grid enter L2 and 
then press a key 1-8 to fill or erase a point in 
that layer. 



The program writes its own code for each 
custom character using a special feature called 
screen editing. It is for this reason that you can 
create only a maximum of four characters at 
any one time. You may return to the program to 
redefine more after ever four characters have 
been generated by the 'G J command. If you try 
to generate a fifth character, the program 
reminds you to use the LI command, You do 
not have to wait for the reminder, especially if 
you only want to redefine one character! 

LOADING A SAVED CHARACTER SET 

To load a character set that you have saved 
using the CHARACTER GENERATION UTILITY, 
use the following program: 

10 OPEN #4,4,0/ F C:":FOR 1=0 TO 1023l 
GET #4,P: POKE 30720 + l,P:NEXT I: 
CLOSE #4 

3072O by the way is simply the page number 
multiplied by 256. If the program that will use 
your custom set is a small one, you may want 
to use another page lower in memory. It's up to 
you, 

A final reminder. Don't forget to POKE 
756,120 (or whatever page you are using) and 
that this must be done every time a new 
Graphics command is used. 



SUBSCRIBE 

to PAGE 6 

see page three for details 



I 



I 



Issue 3 



PAGE 



I 

s 



I 



1 rem KM**8£*m**3s*m***mmm 

2 REM * CHARACTER GENERATOR * 

3 REM * by MICHAEL JACKSON * 

4 REM K**£*0*±S***^*¥S***S*£****K 
56 POKE 1536»0iPQKE 842, I2;GGT0 258 
?? REM *** DIRECT INPUT ROUTINE 

106 A*=CHft*(DS3 s IF A*= r, L" OR h*="I h TH 

EN CLOSE #5 s OPEN #5,4,9 , H K:" :GET H5,DS 

:? CHRiCDS) :A*(LEN(A$) + i)=CHRf CDS) 

150 IF A$='"C H OR A*="c" THEN CLOSE «5: 

OPEN *5,4«fl,"K:" :GET NS.DS:? CHR4<DS) : 

A*CLEN<A$) + D=CHR$(DS> 

230 CLOSE «5 J RETURN 

24? REM KSSMACHINE CODE DATA 

250 FOR 1=0 TO 55: READ A; POKE 1537+ I, A 

tNEXT I 

300 DATA 164, 16?, 0, 162,0, 139,3,224. 15? 

,8.120,232,224.247,203,245, 142,0, 139.0 

,225,157 

350 DATA 0,121,232,224,255,203,245,162 
,0, 139,0 

400 DATA 226,157,0,122,232,224.255,203 
, 245 T 1 62 , . 1 3? , . 227 , 157 , 8 . 1 23 , 232 , 224 
,255,208,245.96 

44? REM ^MACHINE CODE EXECUTION TO C 
OPY ATARI SET TO PAGE 120 
450 X=USR( 1537) 

509 DIM Kt U ) , Pi ?> , C ( 9) , DAT ( 20 8) , KEY ( 1 
0) ,AN$<1) 

54? REM PRESET VARIABLES 
550 L I = 1 ; GC0UNT=8 :XXX= 1 : L IN=PEEK <: 1536) 
600 FOR [«1 TO 8 
650 P<I)=0:C<n=0 
703 NEXT I 
74? REM *S*CREATE A WOftKINS CHARACTER- 

s 

750 FOR 1=1 TO 3 

306 POKE 128*256+32*8+ (I- 1) ,B 

850 NEXT I 

900 DIM C$( :i) ,A*(2) ,B*( 1> :A=2:Y=1 :YY=3 

949 REM S**DRAW UP GRID 

950 GRAPHICS 0;POKE 756,128:P0KE 752.1 
iSETCOLOR 2,12,6:SETC0LQR 4,12,6:SETCG 
LOR 1,12,8 

99? REM USE CTRL TO ENTER LETTERS IN N 

EXT LINE 

1000 POSITION 4,2:? "QRWRWRWRW^FfrJftWftE 

1049 REM NEXT LINE USE SHIFT WITH = SI 
GNS AND CTRL WITH LETTERS 

1050 FOR 1=3 TO 17:P0SITI0N 4, Is? N = ■ 
= = = n = = = J, :IF I/2=INTCI/2) THEN p 

OSITION 4,1:? "ARSRSRSRSRSRSRSRD" 

1180 NEXT I 

1799 REM USE CTRL TO ENTER LETTERS IN 

NEXT LINE 

1888 POSITION 4,18:? "ZRXRXRXRXRXRXRXR 

C" 

1350 FOR 1=1 TO 8 

1908 POSITION 3, 1+1X2:? I 

1958 NEXT I 

2888 FOR 1=1 TO 8 



6 

2850 POSITION 3+1*2,19:? I 

2100 NEXT I 

2150 POSITION 27,6;'' "FILL" 

2288 TRAP 2200rPOSITION 3,0 :? "»BY M. 

JACKS0N«" 

2258 POSITION 22,8 i? "CHARACTER' 1 : POSIT 

ION 22,1:? "GENERATION 11 :PQS IT I ON 22.2: 

? "UTILITY" :REM ALL WORDS IN INVERSE 

2300 POSITION 22,3;? ■ 

_":REM _ IS SHIFT MINUS 

2350 POSITION 22,5:^ "LAYER " ;Y:REM IN 

VERSE 

2400 POSITION 22,6^ "MODE " :REM INVER 

SE 

2450 POSITION 22,7:^ ■ 

_" :REM SHIFT MINUS 

2588 POSITION 22,9s? "STATUS " :POSITIO 

N 22,10:? ■ ,_":REM STA2 

2,10:? " "tREM STATUS 

IN INVERSE, REST SHIFT MINUS 

2550 POSITION 22,12:? " CHARACTERS G" ;PO 

S I T I ON 22,13: ? ■ „ . " : REN 

SHIFT MINUS 
2688 POSITION 22,14:? H Lx=LAYER No-"iP 
OSITION 22,15:? "D= INPUT DATA" :PQSITIO 
N 22,16s? "CH=INPUT CH." 
2650 POSITION 22,17:? jr G=GENERATE" :P0S 
ITION 22,18:? 'U:;L=CLR.GRID N 
2708 CLOSE #5 

2749 REM YOUR INPUT NEXT LINE IN INVER 
SE 

2758 POSITION 29, 9j? "MANUAL ":POSI 
TION 22,28: OPEN »l5,4,8, n Kj":? "YOUR IN 
PUT " ; : a*= " " : GET tt5 , DS : ? CHR» ( DS> ; ; GOS 
UB 108 

2300 FOR DY=1 TO 68 tNEXT DY: POSIT I ON 3 
3,28:? " 

2349 REM KSK IDENTIFY CHOICE 
2850 IF A$= H L1" OR A*=M P THEN YY=3:Y 
=l:GOTO 2258 

2980 IF A*= I, L2" OR A$="12 H THEN YY=5:Y 
=2 s GOTO 2258 

2958 IF A*="L3" OR A*="13" THEN YY=7:Y 
=3iGOTO 2258 

3988 IF A*= !f L4" OR A*= U I4" THEN YY=?sY 
=4; GOTO 2258 

3858 IF A$="L5 lf OR A*="15" THEN YY=11: 
Y=5:G0T0 2258 

3108 IF A*= II L6" OR A*=",6" THEN YY=13: 
Y=6:G0T0 2258 

3158 IF A$="L7" OR A*="17" THEN YY=15: 
Y=7tG0T0 2258 

3208 IF A*="L8" OR A*= M I3" THEN YY=17; 
Y=8:G0T0 2258 

3258 IF A*="LT OR A*="1i" THEN 8358 
3380 IF A*="D" OR A*-"d H THEN POSITION 

29,9:? "DATA INPUT" :GOTO 6558 
3358 IF A*="CH" OR A$*"ch* THEN POSIT I 
ON 2?,9:? "CH. INPUT " :GOTO 6458 
3488 IF At="E" OR A*="e" THEN A^liPOSl 
TION 27,6:? "ERASE" :GQTQ 2258 
3458 IF A«="F" OR A»»'f" THEN A=2:P0SI 

over 



15 



16 



PAGE 6 



Issue 3 



TION 27.6:? "FILL * :GOTO 2258 

350 6 I F A*= ■ G Ir OR A*= " g " T HEN POS IT I ON 

2?,?:? "GENERATE " sGOTG 4050 
3558 IF AS='CL* OR A*="ct" THEN POSIT I 
ON 29 f 9:? "CLEAR " : GOSUB 6 100: GOTO 
2736 

3600 IF WHA*)(1 OR UAL(A*)>8 THEN 00 
TO 2790 
3650 X=8 

369? REM *** IDENTIFY LEUEL-POSITIGN 
3730 FOR IN=1 TO S 
3750 IF VALCA$>=IN THEN X=3+IN*2 
3800 NEXT IN 

3359 B*-" ":REM INVERSE SPACE 
3900 if A=2 THEN B<$=" " :REM INVERSE SP 
ACE 

3950 IF A=l THEN B*=" " 
4000 POSITION X,YVV? BS:G0SU8 8 150: GOT 
2200 

4050 REM ***GENERATIQN ROUTINE 
4i@0 IF GC0UNT>3 THEN POSITION 22,28:? 
" LIST NOW ":POKE 764, 255; GOTO 2208 :R 
EM LIST NOW IN INVERSE 
4 150 GCOUNT=GCQUNT+ 1 
4200 FOR LA* I TO 3 
4250 FOR C0=1 TO 8 
4300 GOSUB 5200 
4350 GOSUB 5650 

4399 REM SPACES IN NEXT LINE IN INVERS 

E 

4400 LOCATE 3+00*2 ,TT,YP| If CHR*(YP>«' 
" THEN P<LA)=P<LA)+SiPGSITION 3+ COM2, 

TTsPUT tW,ASC<' "):GOTG 4500 

4450 POSITION 3+C0*2,TT:PUT #6,ASC<" " 

) 

4580 NEXT CO 

4556 NEXT LA 

4600 POSITION 2,22:? " 

ii 

4649 REM **SCREATION OF WORKING CHARAC 
TER AND DATA WRITE-UP 
4658 POSITION 1,22:? "DATA M ; 
FOR 1=1 TO 8 

POKE 120K256+32*8+(I-l> ,0 
POKE 128X254+32X8+ U- 1),P<I3 
IF A*-"G" OR A*="g" THEN DAT(LI') = 
P(I) : L I = L I + 1 

4900 IF 1-3 THEN ? P<I):GOTO 5000 
? PC I) ; V* 
P<I>-0 
NEXT I 
P=0 

GOTO 2250 

REM *S* CALCULATION OF DATA VALUES 
POSITIONS 

IF LA=1 THEN S=128:TT=3 
IF LA=2 THEN S=64:TT-5 
IF LA*3 THEN S=32;TT=7 
IF LA»4 THEN S=16:TT=9 
IF LA*5 THEN S=8;TT=li 
IF LA*6 THEN S*4:TT=13 



4700 
4750 
4800 
4350 



4950 
5000 
5050 
5100 
5158 
5199 
AND 
5200 
5250 
5386 
5350 
5400 
5458 



5580 
5550 
5600 
5650 
5780 
5750 
5900 
5850 
5900 
5950 

6000 

6050 

6180 

6150 

62%% 

6258 

6380 

6358 

6400 

6458 

SITI 

TER 

6500 

6559 



IF 
IF 
IF 
IF 
IF 
IF 
IF 



S*2 

S=l 



IF LA=7 THEN S=2:TT=15 

IF LA=3 THEN S=J:TT=17 

RETURN 

IF C0=1 THEN 5=128 

C0=2 THEN S=64 

C0=3 THEN S=32 

C0=4 THEN 3=16 

CD=5 THEN S=3 

C0=6 THEN S=4 

C0=7 TH! 

C0=3 THI 
RETURN 

FOR LA=1 TO 8 
FOR PA=1 TO 8 
GOSUB 5200 

POSITION 3+PA*2,TT!? " " 
NEXT PA 
NEXT LA 
RETURN 

POS I T I ON 22,20;? ' YOUR I NPUT ' : PO 
ON 22,21 s? " CHARACTER" ; : REM CHARAC 
IN INVERSE 
INPUT OPPOSITION 31,21:? " 






POSITION K22: 



6608 POSITION 1,22:? "DATA "; 
6650 IF A$»"-D" OR A$= lh d ,, THEN FOR D= 1 
TO S: INPUT DD 

6700 IF A*="D" OR A*="d" THEN POSITION 
6,22: ? " , iC(D)=DO:P0SITI0N 6,22 rN 
EXT D:G0TO 7850 

6749 REM Mi CALCULATION OF CHOSEN CHAR 
ACTER POSITION IN MEMORY 

6750 IF ASC<C*K-3l THEN CHR=ASC<C*J +6 
4: GOTO 6938 

6890 If ASC<C*)>=96 THEN CHR=ASC<C*J :B 

OTO 6900 

6858 CHR=ASC(C*>-32 

FOR C=0 TO 7 

C(C+ 1>=PELK>; 128*256+CHRXS+0 

NEXT C 

GOSUB 6108 

FOR F=l TO 3 

PCF>=C(F) 

NEXT F 

FOR LA- I TO 3 

GOSUB 5288 

FOR F 1— 1 TO 3 

GOSUB 7790 

IF C(LA>/SS>»1 THEN C(LA)=C(LA) -S 
SsPOSITlON 3+FIS2,TTi? B ": GOSUB 3158 
7530 NEXT FI:REM SPACE IN INVERSE 

NEXT LA 

POSITION 22,21:? ■ 

GOTO 4688 

REM ^CALCULATES A CHOSEN CHARAC 

MAKE-UP 

SS=*28 
SS=64 
SS=32 
SS»16 



6900 
6950 

7000 

7050 
7198 
7158 
7200 

7258 
7308 
7350 
7400 
7450 



7550 
76@8 

7650 
7699 
TERS 
7708 
7758 
7880 
7858 



IF 
IF 
IF 

IF 



Fl=l 
FI = 2 

FI=3 
FT =4 



THEN 
THEN 
THEN 
THEN 



™» 



Issue 3 



PAGE 6 



17 



OY 



2203 



,5,3jSETCOLQR 4,5 



:REM WORD 



7900 IF FI=5 THEN SS^8 

7956 IF FI=6 THEN SS=4 

8000 IF FI=7 THEN SS=2 

8050 IF FI=8 THEN SS= 1 

3108 RETURN 

3150 SOUND 6,7,12,10 

8200 FOR DY=1 TO 3: NEXT 

8250 SOUND 0,0,0,8 

3300 RETURN 

3350 IF GCQUNKl THEN 

3360 60SUB 9150 

3400 ? " ) H :SETC0LOR 2 

,3: POKE 756,224 

3450 ? H ' PLEASE WAT 

S IN INMERSE 

3499 REM SXMCREATtON OF EXTRA PROGRAM 

TO REDEFINE CUSTOM CHARACTERS 

9500 ST=1;YY=3 

3550 LIN=LIN+ SsLINE-2iaee+LIN 

8600 POSITION 1,YY:? STR$(LINE> J " FOR 

1=0 TO 7tREAD A:POKE i28*25£+" jKEY<XXX 

) ; " * 8+ 1 . A : NEXT t " : L I NE«L I NE + I : Y Y= YY + 2 

3650 POSITION |,YY:? STR*<LINE* ! '' Dfi^ 

" ; :YY=YY+2:LIN=LIN+1 
3700 FOR Z=ST TO f Ll-lJ 
3750 IF Z*(LI-1) THEN ? DAT i I a GOTO 8? 

00 

3800 IF Z-ST+7 THEN ? DAT- 

X=XXX+l:GOTO 3550 



* :ST=2+ 1 :XX 



yS50 



DAT(Z) ;" 



3980 NEXT 
3^50 POKE 



9000 
9050 
3 
9100 

915m 



153d, LIN 
POSITION l f YY+ir? 
POSITION 1 , 1:PQKE 



"G.9608" 

82, I: POKE 842, i 



3: SET COL OR 4, 



END 

? ">":S£TCOLOR 2.5 
,3:3£TC0L0R 1,5,16 
9200 FOR KEY=1 TO GCOUNT . 

9249 REM SSSKEY CHOICE FOR CUSTOM CHAR 
ACTER ROUTINE 

9250 POSITION 6,18:? "CHOOSE KE> FOR Z 
HARACTER ' J KEY \ " = " : : INPUT K* 

9309 IF ASC(K*)<-31 THEN CHR=ASC< K*> +6 

4: GOTO 9450 

9 350 I F ASC C K*> >= 96 T H EN CHP=A SC ( \W : G 

OTO ?450 

9400 CHR=ASC(K»)-32 

9456 KEY<KEY)«CHR 

9506 NEXT KEY 

9550 RETURN 

9600 POKE 842, 12:: RESTORE 20802 

9650 REM *X*LINES 20001 TO 29999 TO BE 

OCCUPIED BY CREATED PROGRAM 
30601] ? " } " : POKE 32.2:^ :? :? :? "HANT 

TO DEFINE MORE CHARACTERS CY/N) " \ ! INPU 
T AN*: IF AN*="Y" THEN CLR :60T0 450 
30009 REM mSAVE CHARACTER SET ROUT IN 



30010 ? ") lh :> :? :? t? "WANT TO SAVE Y 

OUR CUSTOM SET < Y/N> ";: INPUT AN*: IF AN* 

- - N" THEN END 

30020 ? ">":? :? :? :? "PUSH RECORD AN 

D PLAY -PRESS RETURN" 

30040 OPEN #2,8,9, "C:" 

30050 FOR 1=0 TO 1023:P=PEEKC 129*256+1 

) :PUT #2,P*NEXT I 

30060 CLOSE #2:? '}":? i? :? :? "YOUR 

SET HAS BEEN SAVED" : END 



Demos 



This demonstration was suggested by a short 
program on drawing circles sent in by Terry 
Lawson. I have turned it into a demo of the 
effects available in Graphics 10. Thanks to 
Terry, without whose little program I would not 
have known how to draw a circle! {This actually 
comes up as an oval because of the pixel layout 
of Graphics 10.) 

10 GRAPHICS IQsFGR 1=1 TO 8: POKE 704+1 
,1s l6+6:NEXT I 

15 H=40:H=35 
2% DEG 



30 

35 

^0 

56 

60 

■ 

S8 

VIJ 

. '.' '■:• 
200 

210 

230 



T^ R=£ THEN 200 

>P : COLOR C, 4: PLOT W,H 

A*A+ 1^1 

■ =fl + S 1 1 -J =: iM i *R 
v=H-COS'rt' *R 
0R#*fT0 y , i 
IF h~375 THEN 

GOTO 50 

CO=PEEK' ~05:' 

POKE X,PEEK(X*P 

X=X+I:IF X<712 THEN 210 

POKE 7 12, CO {GOTO 289 



P=R-1:A=0:OOTO 35 
X= 76 5 



jg PEH k ^t RECTANGLES *3#* 

. .. ■— ' 

^0 GRmP l4 ;':& 5+ 1,6 

40 COLOR INT' RND : 8>*3+ 1) 

50 ^-lNTtRND' , B>S69j :r=lNTtRND(0>S33) 

60 X 1 = INT^RNDi0' *7+3> : n=INT^RNO<0J *7+ 

70 PLOT X,V:DRAWT0 *+Xl*YtDRANT0 K+Xl, 
■;*": llDRAWTO X ,'v+v I : BRANT X,"i 

?s goto 4e 



18 



PAGE 6 



Issue 3 



KEYBOARD TECHNIQUES 

Les Ellingham 



There are two commonly used methods of 
obtaining input from the keyboard during a 
program. The first is the INPUT statement 
which can be used to input either a numeric 
variable or a string and the second is the GET 
statement which accepts only one keystroke in 
the form of an ATASCII number. Appendix C of 
the Basic Reference Manual gives a full list of 
the ATASCII character set and corresponding 
decimal codes. 

One thing both these statements have in 
common is that they stop the program until 
such time as a key is pressed and in the case of 
the INPUT statement, until RETURN is pressed. 
In certain cases this can be a distinct 
disadvantage. You may, for instance, wish to 
set a time limit in which to enter an answer to a 
question or may wish to have a 'real-time' 
battle scene giving you only seconds in which 
to attack or defend. For both these situations 
neither INPUT or GET are of any use. 
Fortunately there is an answer and that is to 
take a PEEK at the keyboard. Memory location 
764 holds a value which corresponds to the last 
key pressed or contains the value 255 if no key 
is pressed. So all you have to do is PEEK 
location 764, read the ATASCII code and 
convert that to see which key you pressed. 
Right? No, wrong! Unfortunately, the value 
stored in location 764 has no relation whatever 
to the ATASCII code and is an internal code 
recognised only by your Atari. 

You can easily program around this 
limitation by combining a PEEK to location 764 
with a GET statement, but in many cases there 
Is no need to print out the character of the key 
pressed and it would be helpful to be able to 
include the keyboard code in your program for 
immediate recognition. The Basic Reference 
Manual does not include a list of the keyboard 
codes and I have not seen them printed 
elsewhere, so the accompanying chart lists the 
internal code of all the keys. 

Fine, another chart to refer to, but what 
practical use can this be put to? I mentioned 
earlier a 'real-time' battle scene where you had 
to input information quickly to attack or defend. 



When attacking, you may, for instance, wish to 
hit J H' for an attack to your opponent's head, 'B' 
for an attack to the body or 'L' for an attack to 
the legs. The following subroutine can be used. 



tie 

128 
148 



POKE 764, 255: FOR 1=1 TO 20 
IF PEEK'* 764'' *57 THEN GOTO 560 
IF PEEK<?44>=2I THEN GOTO 466 
IF PEEK (764 ) =8 THEN GOTO 766 
NEXT I l? "OUT OF "I ME" 1 



Line 500 would determine the outcome of a 
blow to your opponent's head, line 600 to his/ 
{its?) body and line 700 to the legs. The length 
of the loop should be altered to suit how 
quickly you wish to react. If you failed to hit any 
of the correct keys, the program would return 
from the subroutine to allow your opponent to 
continue his attack. If this type of subroutine is 
used for a 'surprise' attack, preceded only by a 
quick warning, it is surprising how nimble you 
have to be to hit the right keys I 

If you wish to use location 764 to obtain an 
answer within a time limit, then again PEEK at 
the keyboard from within a loop. Suppose, for 
example, you have a program which poses a 
question and gives a choice of four answers — 
A, B, C or D. The following can be used as a 
subroutine (assume C is the right answer). 



POKE 764, 255: FOR 1=1 
IF PEEK<764>=1S THEN 



TO 266 
? "RIGHT 



URN 

120 IF PEEK (7<S4)<> 255 AND PEEK 

8 T HO 1 ? "I <l R ON G " : RET URN 

130 NEXT li? "TIME UP" :RETURN 



64) 



There must be many other ways to use the 
internal keyboard code and also routines which 
involve POKEing location 764. Certainly you 
can fool your Atari into thinking you have 
pressed RETURN by a POKE 764,12. When you 
next load a program try typing POKE 
764,1 2-CLOAD (make sure that the tape is ready 
first!). 



— — 



Issue 3 



PAGE 6 



19 



NEW GAMES FOR ATARI 



ANDROID ATTACK 16k £14.95 



FIGHT YOUR WAV THROUGH LEVELS QF 
DEADLY ANDROID GUARDS TO SAVE THE 
RUNAWAY HUCLEAH REACTOE, THEM TRY TO 
SAVE YOURSELF! 



v**° 



o*- 



^orf* 



v^>- 



AAARRGH! 16k £11.95 

A FAST, ?RAiJTiC CHASE ARDUMD THE SCREEN 
TRYING TO CATCH 5QME CHAIY CREATURES. 
tl YPU CATCH THE * iUFER-AAAERRCGO! ♦, 
YOU'LL GET A SUPER BDMUS - BUT DON'T CRT 
POISONED' 



STARBASE ASSAULT 16k £11.95 



HDW LONG CAM YOU PHOTECT TDUR 3TARBA5E 
FROM THE ATTACKING ALIEN ARMADA? EACH 
HIT WEAKENS YOUR FORCE FIE1D RINGS AMD 
NDW THEY 'RE ATTACKING FIVE AT A TIME 1 



^O^ 



0^ 



ROCKET MAN 16k £9.95 



NAVIGATE THE RDCEZT-KAK AROUND THE TWISTS AMD 
TURKS OF THE LABYRINTH AND BACK HOME 



THE MAD SPIKER 16k £4.95 



KEEP YOUR SAW SHARP AND DONT STEP ON A DRAIN! 



ALSO 32KRAMPACK £59,95 

FROM: BLABY VIDEO A COMPUTER GAMES, 
Crossways House, Lutterworth Road, 
Blaby, Leicester. Tel: (0533) 773641 



CHnnneL 



The secret of learning to program is to 
experiment. Try expanding the simple routines 
given and making up some of your own. The 



< 



SOFTWARE 



'NEW EXPANDED RANGE 
OF SOFTWARE' 

'1 6K ADVENTURES FOR ATARI 



The Golden Baton 

Arrow of Death Part 1 

Arrow of Death Part 2 

The Time Machine 

Escape from Pulsar 7 

Circus 

Feasibility Experiment 



16KCASS, T7.99 
17.99 
17.99 
17.99 
17.99 
17.99 
17.99 



GAMES FOR ATARI 
Bomb Hunter 1 @k CASS. 1 6, 50 

Murder at Awesome Hall 12 95 

CavBsof Death 2 4K C AS S. 1 9 . 9 5 

Caves of Death 32KDISCT9 9B 

UTILITY FOR ATARI 
The Constructor 4BK DISC 24 95 

GAMES FOR VIC 20 

The Black Squid + 3K CASS. 9 95 

GAMES FOR COMMODORE 64 

Landflr 20K CASS. 14.95 

Prices include VAT & Postage. Dealer enquiries w«feom«. 

MA ft ORDER TO: Dept,P6 

Channel 8 Software Ltd., 

51 Fishergate, Preston, Lanes. 

Tel; 0772-53057. 



suggestions are only a couple of many uses for 
a PEEK at the keyboard. What other interesting 
applications can you find? 



INTERNAL KEYBOARD CODES 



KEY 

1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
? 



A 
B 
C 
D 

E 



CODE 

3 1 
30 
26 
24 
29 
z7 
51 



43 
50 



13 
58 
42 



KE 

F 
G 
H 
I 
■J 

K 

i 

i_ 

M 
N 

P 
Q 
R 



CODE 

5 6 

i i 

57 

i 3 

i 
i 

5 





16 

40 



KE'i 
U 

G i 

W 

■.•;■ 

V 

■J 

■L. 

ESC 

EhCK £ 
TAB 

RETURN 



CODE 



i I 



■-' 3 

~' ""I 1 

j_ _■ 

2S 
54 

t - 

44 
14 
15 
12 



KE' 



ODE 



T. 






t 


CAPS/ 


1 


ow 


£0 


• 






32 








34 
33 
39 



.PACE 



PRESSING SHIFT AT THE SAME TIME ADDS -:4. PRESSING CTRL AT T?IE SAME TIME ADDS 12 3. 

PRESSING SHIFT AKD CTRL AT THE BaKE TIME AS A KEY ADDS 132, BUT ONLY *r THE KE* 
VALUE IE 24 C-R OVER 



— 



20 



PAGE 6 



Issue 3 



Character 
Designer 

Paul Stevens 



(Editor's note: This program does not offer ail 
the facilities of the CHARACTER GENERATION 
UTILITY but is superb graphically and very easy 
to use. It only uses 16K). 

This program let's you design your own 
characters using the joystick on an 8 x 8 grid. It 
then works out and displays the DATA for you 
to incorporate in your own program. 

A flashing marker will show your position on 
the grid, To fill in a square simply press the fire 
button. To erase the square press the button 
again. 



KfcM 
REM 

REM 
REM 
REM 
REM 



***#**£****&*** ******* 

* CHARACTER DESIGNER * 

* BY PAUL SIEMENS * 
X 6/3/83 * 



3 6 GRAPHICS 23: POKE 559,9; POKE 708, 134 
: POKE 709 , 252 : POKE 716,6s POKE ? 11,1 38 : 
POKE 752,1 

26 REM ALTER DISPLAY Ll 
30 A=f>E£K< 560) +PEEK* 56 l>*256+4 
40 POKE A-I,76;P0KE A+2,6:P0KE h<,2:P 
OKE A+95,2-iP0K£ A+97,2;^GKE 569,554 
56 POKE 87, i; POSIT ION ],@:' J *::'■-■■ 
t er des i gn &r " : REM I NO ERSE V I DEO 
60 POKE 87 , 8 : PCS 1 1" I ON 2 , 3 J ? " DAT* 0,0, 
0,0,8 f 0,0»0' 1 

70 REM POKE WRITING TO SCREEN BOTTOM 
30 A=PEEK(3S> + PEEK'i.39) S256+3729 
90 FOR C=i TO 47: READ D,E:P0KE h+D,E:N 
EXT C 



100 DATA 5,48,6,50,7,: 



~ o = . 1 ■;■ 



1,11 



79,12,136,13,161,14,178,15,180.17,52, I 
8,47 ,28 ,35,21 ,33,22 , 44 ,23 , 35 , 24 , 53 

110 DATA 25, 44, 26. 33, 27, 52, 28, 37, 30, 36 
,31,33,32,52,33,33,35,48,36,50,87,37,8 
9,51,89,51,91, 175,92, 176,93, IBS 

129 DATA 94, 169, 95 , 175 ,96 , 1 74 , 98 , 52 . 99 
,47,101,35,102,44,103,37, 104,33, 105, 5* 
,197,39,108,58,109,41,116,36 

130 POKE 37,7: COLOR 1 
140 REM DRAW 3x8 GRID 

150 FOR A=9 TO 39 STEP 10 

160 PLOT 40,A:DRAWTQ 12@,A:NEXT A 

170 FOR A=40 TO 120 STEP 10 

180 PLOT A,9:DRAHTQ A, 39: NEXT A 

190 POKE 559,34 






9 EM MGUE MARKER ON 3RID 

v,=45:V=s!4 
S=3 r 10r" h ■■ 



1 I 

IF 
IF 

! " 

* r 



200 

210 

22$ 
2^ 
240 
250 
269 

230 

3m 

310 

338 

340 
■■-: 
360 
370 
2 3 tf 

406 REM FIuL li-GO^RE 



PEEK 1 532 79>^fi THB4 4<?9 
PEEt ' 532 7* '■ = 1 T HEN 669 
3»14 THEM GDSUB 370:Y-Y-10 
3= i 3 THEN OCS'JR 370:Y SS ¥ + 10 
3-1: THEN GOSUB 379:X*X-19 
3=7 THEN GOSUB 370 5X-X+10 
;«45 T HEN a=115 
> : :15 "HEN - = 45 



T LI 

i > 

I C 



iH 



FHEN 



:£4 



3 -J T"H£N i=14 
iIOLOR 0:PLOT > .V 
FOP DELAf-3 TO S3 i NEXT DELAY 
l 1 STPiO 0=9 THEN 4!0 
COLOR 3:PlO' \,fsGOTQ 228 
POKE 53279.0: LOCATE X*1,Y-C 
; c C~y THEN COLOR 0*PLOT • , i 
RETORN 



420 IF 0=0 TAit^i-J COLOR 2: O=i00 
43? IF C*2 ':7lF\ 70.09 0:0=200 
44£ 3'OONC .0, 10, 8: POKE 77 -.' 

FOP B-i -4 70 ?*4 
460 PLOT /"4,3:DR*kT0 * + 4.8:NE>TT E 
A '6 30UNI 0.9,0,0 :00 T 2^ 

4S6 pem 3CAN 5Rid i calculate data 

- if : -l.7 ~ X.irrPLOl 0,10;POK£ 3" 
.tfiPOSITION 7 ,3: L ' 

ll 

500 POKE ':■ . ! 3=c 

•jjg t: : ;;o g- M "ij 34 STEF 10 

52* t>256:H=e 

1&. pqp h= ij5 ro L 15 STEP 19 

540 E=E-E/2 

55t LOCATE A+i<B,=: 

560 IF C=2 THEN H^H+E 

5 70 NEXT p. 

538 REM PRINT DrTh 

59 PLOT 6 , 10 : POKE 37 , : P03 1 T I ON D , 3 : ? 

1 , - ; H 

*09 IF D=6 THEN POSITION D*3i? " " 

ol0 IF H>~I60 THEN D=D+4 

620 IF ^5 00 THEN IF H>9 THEN D=D+3 

630 IF H<10 THEN D=D+2 

640 POKE 3 7, 7: NEXT B J GOTO 220 

659 REN CLEAR GRID 

660 COLOR 9 

679 FOP B=14 TO 94 STEP 10 

689 FOR A=45 TO 125 STEP 10 

690 LOCATE A,B S C:IF CO 2 THEN 729 
708 FOR D-8-4 TO E+4:PL0T A-4,D 
710 DRAWTO A+4,D:NEXT D 

720 NEXT A:NEXT B:PL0T &.19 
739 POKE 37,0: POSITION 7,3:? "0,0,9,0, 
0,0,9,0 "iPQKE 87,7 

749 GOTO 210 



Issue 3 



PAGE 6 



21 



Software Reviews 



FLOYD OF THE JUNGLE 



MICROPROSE 



1/4 PLAYERS 



32 K CASS. 



32 K DISK 



Silly title! Still I suppose that Tarzan is 
copyrighted, so Floyd is as good as any. In this 
game you, as Floyd, have to rescue the lovely 
Janice by thrashing your way through the 
jungle which is set out like a combination of 
Apple Panic and Frogger. Instead of ladders 
you have vines to climb and instead of the 
assorted perils of Frogger, you have snakes, 
alligators, tigers, pygmies, monkeys and 
elephants all wandering along ready to eat or 
squash you. You still have the river with boats 
to jump on to get across. On the way to saving 
Janice, you can score points by capturing birds 
and 'punching pygmies'. Trouble is, it is hard to 
tell the difference between the birds, pygmies 
and monkeys, and the monkeys are deadly. 

The biggest plus of the game is that it allows 
up to four players (all Floyds?) at the same time 
to race against each other in a bid to become 
the first to rescue the damsel. The screen is 
very colourful with snakes hissing back and 
forth, alligators opening and closing their 
mouths, monkeys swaying to and fro, etc*, and 
Floyd actually runs with arms and legs going 
full peit. Point him in the right direction with the 
joystick and press the fire button to watch him 
bound along or jump over the animals. Watch 
out for those poison pygmy darts on the way! 
Once you get the timing right for your jumps, 
the game is not too difficult and as you have 
unlimited Floyds, it doesn't matter too much if 
you are eaten — you only return to the 
beginning. Screen two is harder, obviously, and 
screen three has the river to cross and plenty of 
elephants. Playing solo, I quickly got up to 
screen three and once I had mastered riding the 
elephants, managed to rescue Janice. I eagerly 
looked forward to the super challenges of 
screen four only to find that the game ended. 
You have to start at a higher level to get to 
screens four and five. 



To master this game is fairly easy, but then it 
is not really a one player game. All the fun 
comes in racing against the other Floyds and 
picking up bonus birds and pygmies whilst 
watching your opponents being eaten by 
alligators! At times, the game can get quite 
hilarious and you won't know whether to 
concentrate on your own Floyd or watch the 
others in peril. 

If you are a dedicated gamer and welcome 
the big challenge, don't bother with Floyd of 
the Jungle, but if you want some FUN, 
particularly if you know someone with two 
more joysticks, this could be just the game. I 
imagine that the kids will love it. 



CHOPPER RESCUE 



MICROPROSE 



1/4 PLAYERS 



32 K CASS. 



32 K DISK 



Not really what I imagined it to be. I had 
expected this to be another version of 
Choplifter but it is an underground labyrinth 
type game where you have to fly your chopper 
and rescue people from ledges and various 
nooks and crannies. Of course there are plenty 
of things to stop you — these games are never 
THAT easy. 

I was quite taken with Chopper Rescue, it is 
PLAYABLE yet still has quite a lot of challenge. 
Not being the world's best arcade player, J get 
fed up with games that kill me off every 5 
seconds but I found in Chopper Rescue that you 
at least had a chance when danger lurked. 
There are plenty of obstacles to your rescue 
mission. Laser guns are stationed on the walls, 
bomb pods shoot spinning explosive upwards, 
whilst force fields bar your way. All of these can 
be destroyed with either your missiles or 
bombs. There are also several pulsating pods 
that either supply energy to the enemy lasers or 
act as hatching plants for the 'mutants' that 
come for you every so often. Didn't I mention 
them? Oh well, you can kill them off. Best idea 



22 



PAGE 6 



Issue 3 



is to destroy everything in sight r that way you 
are safer and get more points. After rescuing 
ten hostages, you go on to a more difficult 
labyrinth with more obstacles and pods. Some 
of these are very difficult to get to, but you can 
release your bombs with forward momentum 
and sort of 'throw' them into the narrow 
channels. 

A word about the confusion over the 'energy 
pods'. The problem is that with these 
MicroProse games, the documentation is pretty 
basic to say the least, in fact, considering the 
price (normal Atari Prices), it is downright poor. 
I know that it is the game that counts, and this 
one is very good, but if we have to continue 
paying these high prices, then would it not be 
asking too much to have some extensive and 
well presented literature for our money? 

RAIDUS 



one direction you carry on moving and can go 
careering from screen to screen until you 
inevitably crash into something. The only way 
to slow down is by applying thrust in the 
opposite direction but it is not easy. The effect 
is rather like trying to drive a car on an ice rink. 
What it is like at the more difficult levels, 1 dread 
to think. During the time 1 had this game to 
review, I didn't even get down to the planet's 
surface and there are 216 levels in all. Yes, 216! 
What's more, each level can only be accessed 
by a password gained by completing the 
previous level. 

If you want a real challenge, then this game 
appears ideal. It easily lives up to its claim of 
being 'a game you will not easily master' and 
with 216 levels of play you will have to spend 
many hours (weeks?) developing your skills 
before you can claim to have completed your 
mission. 



PYRAMID SOFTWARE 



16 K CASS. HELLCAT ACE 



1 PLAYER 



32 K DISK 



MICROPROSE 



32 K CASS. 



The latest space action game Raidus has you 
in an attack fighter within the Mother Ship high 
above one of the planets of the Cronian Empire. 
Miles below on the planet surface is one of the 
Evil Overlords — mechanical devices that act as 
security posts for the Cronians. You must leave 
the Mother Ship, fly down to the planet surface 
whilst avoiding the enemy patrols and space 
boulders, find and destroy the Evil Overlord 
and return to the Mother Ship to continue your 
mission on another planet. 

The action is spread over dozens of screens, 
but the ga me does not scrol I, rather it flips from 
screen to screen but does give the impression 
of continuous movement. The graphics of the 
Mother Ship and the cities on the planet surface 
are very good but out in space are just 
hundreds of stars, too many to make it look 
realistic. What's it like to play? HARD! In fact I 
found it so hard that I lost the majority of my 
craft just getting out of the Mother Ship! 
Control is by the joystick, but once you move in 



l/4 PLAYERS 



48K DISK 



Go and get the seat belt from the car and 
strap yourself into the chair. You'll need it for 
this World War II flying simulation! The screen 
gives you the view from the cockpit of your 
aircraft as you battle against the Japanese in 14 
different scenarios based on actual events in 
the battles of the Pacific in World War II. The 
graphics are simple but the overall effect is 
quite stunning as you bank, dive, climb or loop 
the loop to get the enemy in your gunsights. 
There are even instructions on how to do 
Immelmann turns and Split S's! The sun lies 
just above the horizon and as you turn away the 
sky darkens to give you an idea of your 
heading. You can do al! of the manoeuvres 
expected and if you get into trouble you can try 
to ditch or bail out. For the more experienced 
there are night missions. 

This is a great simulation giving a real feel of 
action but I have never flown a light aircraft and 



Issue 3 



PAGE 6 



23 



do not know how accurate ft is. Any RAF flying 
officers out there who are into computer 
games? Is this as realistic as it seems? I thought 
it was great. 



LEGIONNAIRE 

AVALON HILL 
1 PLAYER 



16KCAS5, 



Legionnaire is the latest offering from Chris 
Crawford, the man who designed Eastern Front 
which was a major step forward tn micro- 
computer gaming. Legionnaire is better than 
Eastern Front. Much better. It has all of the 
challenge (unless you are a very experienced 
War-gamer), better looking graphics, multiple 
choices of scenario and above all, the battles 
happen in real time. Still no game save feature 
but with all the options available you can 
choose a fairly short campaign. 

For those not familiar with the style of 
Eastern Front, the structure of Legionnaire is of 
a large map of the terrain on which your battles 
will take place. The map scrolls in any direction 
and is perhaps 12 times larger than your 
television screen so that battles are taking place 
outside your immediate vision. You command 
Caesar and up to 9 other Legions in battles 
against barbarian tribes that outnumber you 
two to one. By giving your troops orders of 
movement you can use the terrain to best 
advantage to attack, outflank or surround your 
enemy. Everything is programmed in — slower 
movement uphill, fatigue and morale of the 
troops, strength, fighting ability, losses in 
combat — all are taken care of by the computer 
and the current state of any unit can be seen by 
positioning the cursor over a unit and pressing 
the fire button. There is a 20 page manual 
which gives you historical background, details 
of the various legions at your command and 
details of the barbarian tribes. You need to get 
some idea of the capabilities of your units 
beforehand because as soon as you press the 



Start button the barbarians start advancing. 
Remember this is in real time and requires 
some quick thinking. 

Legionnaire is an excellent demonstration of 
the capabilities of your Atari, its presentation 
will make owners of other computers wonder 
why they didn't buy the best. Atari themselves 
did not want this in their catalogue which 
shows exactly why they are not making the 
headway they should be with the best 
computer on the market. All credit to Avalon 
Hill, although they were not taking much of a 
gamble, for Legionnaire is a sure fire success. 
Only one criticism and that is the lack of credit 
to Chris Crawford in the packaging. Hrs name 
appears only in small type as Game Designer 
and Avalon Hill ought to realise that in the Atari 
world the name of Chris Crawford is now 
synonymous with that of Scott Adams. 



Software for review kindly supplied by 
Calisto Computers of Birmingham and Avalon 
Hill Games of London. 



THE PAGE 6 AWARDS 



YOU COULD WIN UP TO £50 OF 
SOFTWARE IN OUR ANNUAL AWARDS 



AT THE END OF OUR FIRST YEAR WE WILL 
HAVE A READERS POLL TO FIND THE BEST 
PRDGRAMS,ART!CLES AMD REVIEWS FROM 
THE FIRST 6 ISSUES, ALL CONTRIBUTIONS 
TO THE MAGAZINE ARE WELCOMED AND 
THIS COULD BE YOUR CAHNCE TO EARN 
FAME AND FORTUNE' 



SEND YOUR CONTRIBUTION NOW 



24 



PAGE 6 



Issue 3 



Master 
Directory 

Colin Friston 

As an extension to the Disk Directory in Issue 
2, I now present a Master Directory which will 
give you a print-out of all programs on your 
disks in alphabetical order. 

The program will request the insertion of all 
your disks, one after another and store the 
contents in two strings, LI $ and L2$* These are 
then sorted into alphabetical order and printed 
out. The program can accept up to 300 entries 
and has the facility in lines 1000 on to exclude 
often recurring items such as DQS,DUP SYS 
etc. 

i REM x**sosx***s*****Hmm*£K* 

2 REM £ MASTER DIRECTORY * 

3 REM 3 BY * 

4 REM * COLIN FRISTON * 

5 rem KK*xKsxxKmmmmsmsxK 



REM 



7 DIM Ll*<5999) ,L2*<5999) ,T*(30) ,A$(29 
) ,DISK*< 19) ,DATE*<40> ,SPACE*<28) 

8 GRAPHICS 6:P0KE 712,48iPGKE 713,43:? 
:? , "MASTER DIRECTORY":? :L1=-2?jL2"L 

1 

9 ? "INPUT DATE ";: INPUT DATE* 

19 FOR T=l TO (40-LINCDATE*)>/2jSPACE* 
<TJ) = " B :NEXT T 

15 ? :? "WAIT - 5 K STRINGS BEING CLEA 
RED.":? :FQR T=l TO 5909 STEP 29:L1*(T 

,T+19) = " "sNEXT T 

20 L2*=L]*:B0T0 69 

39 OPEN #i,6,i,"D:X.X" 

40 INPUT m,A*i60SUB 1999sIFA$>" N" 
THEN 55 

50 Ll=Li + 30!ll*(Li,tl+19>=A*iLl*ai + 20 
,L1+29)=DISK*:G0T0 40 

55 L2=L2+39:L2«CL2,L2+19)=A*:L2*(L2+20 
,L2+29)=DISK$:GOT0 40 

69 TRAP 40:? :? t? "INSERT DISK WHEN 8 
USY LIGHT GOES OUT. TYPE <ST0 
P> TO STOP." 

70 CLOSE #lr? :? "DISK NUMBER "jiINPUT 
DISKS:IF DISK*O ir ST0P* THEN 30 

509 N1=L1/30!N2=L2/30;TRAP 790 

595 LPRINT s LPRINT " MASTER 

DIRECTORY ":LPRINT H 
AS AT": LPRINT SPACE* j DATE* : LPRINT 

510 GRAPHICS SPOKE 712,178: POKE 710,1 
78: POKE 752,1 

511 ? :? ," MASTER DIRECTORY':? 

512 ? ," SORT IN PROGRESS. ":? :? ," 
("j!NT(Nl+N2+2) ;" ITEMS). ":? 



610 NNl=Ll:FOR LOOP 1=1 TO 11-39 STEP 3 

9 

620 FOR J 1=1 TO NN1-30 STEP 30 

630 IF Ll*CJl,Jl + 29)>Ll$CJl + 30,JH-59) 

THEN T*=Ll*<Jl+30 s Jl + 59) iLl*< JJ + 39, J 1 + 

59>=L1*U1,JH-2?>:L1*(J1,J1+29)=T* 

640 NEXT JliPOSITION 15,7:? "C u ;iNT<<L 

OOP 1+603/30) ;" DONE) ,' :NN1=NN 1-39: NEXT 

L00P1 
642 NN2=L2iF0R L0OP2= 1 TO L2-30 STEP 3 


644 FOR J2=l TO NN2-39 STEP 39 
646 IF L2$(J2,J2+29)>L2*(J2+39,J2+59) 
THEN T*=L2fKJ2+30,J2+59) :L2*( J2+39, J2+ 
59>=L2$CJ2,J2+29) :L2$< J2, J2+29)=T* 
648 NEXT J2;P0SITI0M 15,7:? "C;INT<<L 
OOP l+LODP2+90)/39> i " DONE) . ■ ;NN2=NN2-3 
0:NEXT L00P2 
655 ? :? ," SORT COMPLETE.":? 

669 FOR M1=J TO LI STEP 30 

665 POSITION 6,13:PRINT INT CM 1/30+ 1) J " 
: "iLl*(Ml,Ml + 29>5 i 

670 LPRINT " Jl ;INT(Ml/30+D;": "; 
Ll*(Ml,Ml + 25) :NEXT Ml 

672 FOR M2=l TO L2 STEP 30 

673 POSITION 6,13:PRINT INTC (Ml+M2)/39 

+ D ;": "|L2*(M2,M2+29) ;" 

■ 

674 LPRINT " ■ j INTC (Ml+M2)/39+ ]) ; 
"J n iL2$(M2,M2+25) :NEXT M2i GRAPHICS 0j 
TRAP 40098 sLPRINT :LPRINT :END 

700 TRAP 709:? :? 'PRINTER NOT SWITCHE 
D ON !■:? j? "SWITCH ON PRINTER AND TY 
PE (GOTO 505> TO RECOVER." : END 
1006 IF A*C3jl3)="DIR " THEN 40 

1010 IF A*(3,13>="DQS SYS" THEN 49 

1029 IF A$C3,13)" J, DUP SYS" THEN 40 

1039 IF A*C3,13>="MEM SAU" THEN 40 

1040 IF A*<],1)=*X" THEN A*Uj2) = " ' : 
A*U8,19)=" 
1109 RETURN 



i 



WHOOPS!,., ERROR 17 

Like all the quality magazines, we need a 
blunders corner sometimes which we will call 
ERROR 17 (look it up in your Manual!). 

Issue 2 contained the following which should 
be amended. 

Four In A Row — line 10045 should be 
deleted. 

In the article GTIA modes, the word 'line' in 
the third paragraph should read 'hue'. 



Issue 3 



PAGE 6 



25 



First Steps 



Many beginners do not understand REM 
statements and believe they are responsible for 
program errors. They are in a way — If you 
don't bother to read them! A REM statement 
actually has no effect at all on the running of a 
program, it is there to help you understand 
what is going on or to give you help in typing in 
the listing. If you wish you can leave out all 
REM statements thus saving a lot of typing, but 
be careful. Sometimes a program branches to a 
line containing a REM statement and if you did 
not type that line you will get ERROR 12. The 
solution is to change the line number of the 
GOTO or GOSUB so that it refers to the line 
immediately following the line that you didn't 
type. Leaving out REMs will save you some 
typing but it is very important that you read all 
REMs before you type in a program. Quite often 
they give you clues on how to type in the 
following lines and if you don't work it out you 
will end up with all sorts of problems. Take 
TINY TEXT in Issue 2 for example. Line 580 
gives you clues for typing the next few lines. 
The funny little symbol that you can't find in 
your Manual is a peculiarity of the printer. It 
cannot reproduce the right pointed arrow 
which you get by pressing E$C,TAB and so line 
580 gives you a clue by saying that the symbol 
represents ESC,TAB. Try pressing ESC followed 
by TAB to see the 'arrow' referred to. 
Remember, REM statements are there to help 
you, not the program (they actually slow the 
program down). Make sure you read them 
before typing any lines referred to. 

Did you know that you can stop a listing from 
scrolling up the screen by pressing CTRL and 1 
at the same time? Pressing them again will start 
the listing up again. Even the experts took a 
long time to find that out! 

The Atari has superb editing facilities but few 
people seem to use them properly. Sit down 
awhile and look through Chapter 3 of the 
Reference Manual and play around with the 
screen. If you use editing properly you will save 
a lot of time. Suppose for example you have to 
type the following lines 




VICTAGRAPH - PLOT WINDOW 

The above photographs show VICTAGRAPH PLOT 

Wl N DOW and demonst rati ons R U N on AT A R 1 400 . G R 8 . 

Have you got PLOT, DRAWTO or similar to an absolute 

coordinate?. 

Could you draw the above screen display?. 

Without using graph -paper? 

Place your drawing in the VICTAGRAPH and your are ready 
to plot all the points, using the movable window mask and 
easy to read scale. Plot 0,0 in each corner and a fully 
adjustable window to 320,200. . .working area 1 3" x 8" total 
size 1 7" x 12" appro*. 
Total Price E7.00. Cheque PO to: V1CTA CERAMICS 




VICTA CERAMICS^) 

6A BOW STREET, RUGELEY, STAFFS, WS15 2B 




10 IF A=6THEN GOTO 100 
20 IF A=7 THEN GOTO 200 

Instead of typing both lines, type in line 10 
and then use the CTRL/UP ARROW keys to put 
the cursor over the 1 of 1 and type 2. Move the 
cursor right with the CTRL7RIGHT ARROW keys 
until it is over the 6 and type 7. Move the cursor 
right again to the 1 of 100 and type 2. Now 
press RETURN. All you will see is line 20, but 
now list the program. Presto! Two lines for the 
price of one (almost). Use the editing facilities 
whenever you see lines that are similar to lines 
you have already typed and you will save a lot 
of time. Don't forget that you can insert or 
delete characters in a line by using CTRL/ 
INSERT or CTRL/DELETE. 

Just for fun, try the following program. Put 
the word 'PRESS' in inverse. More about PEEKs 
and POKEs in future issues, 

10 ? CHR$(125}:? "PRESS SOME KEYS" 
20 POKE 755 r PEEK(764}:GOTO 20 



26 



PAGE 6 



Issue 3 



B.U.G. Club Call 



BUG seems to be getting bigger! If you have 
attended the last few meetings you will know 
how crowded it can get, and we must start 
thinking about some solutions to make sure 
that everybody gets a look in and finds it 
worthwhile to attend. Two things are being 
considered — weekly meetings and a bigger 
meeting place. We need your help on both. 
There is no point in arranging weekly meetings 
if there is not going to be enough support, and 
please bear in mind that the meetings do take a 
lot of effort to organise. If you are genuinely 
interested in meeting weekly, let us know and 
indicate what sort of format you would be most 
happy with. The room we have at present is 
good value despite its limitations but we would 
like to be able to consider alternatives either for 
alternate meetings if we go weekly or as a new 
permanent home. Somebody knows of a room 
in Birmingham, either a hotel, pub or club 
which might be suitable. Please make some 
enquiries and let one of the committee know. 
We may well stay where we are but at least it 
would be handy to know if there are 
alternatives. 

Mike Aston's Basic Course will have come to 
an end by now but the Club is anxious to 
continue to provide tutorials for members. We 
could arrange classes on specific subjects such 
as character redefinition, display lists, sound, 
graphics, etc., but it does take a lot of work to 
get together a decent course and it can be 
discouraging if there is not much interest. So 
let Mike know what you would be interested to 
learn and whether you can offer any assistance. 
The opportunity to learn is one of the prime 
reasons for having a User Group and is a very 
valuable part of BUG'S make-up. 

Now that the membership has grown there 
are many diverse interests among members 
and we need a way to channel interests so that 
everyone has the opportunity to join in 
something in which they are interested. We 
want to develop a number of Special Interest 
Groups which will run on a self-help basis 
where half a dozen or so of like minded people 
can get together to explore a particular area, tt 
could be anything from writing an Adventure to 
learning a new language or writing machine 
language games. It could be something as 
simple as getting a party to play Zork. Being 



part of a small group will help you to develop 
more quickly and will give you the opportunity 
to meet outside the Club. Something good will 
come of some of the groups, such as writing a 
book or developing a game to market. If you are 
interested then get in touch with Keith Mason 
who is willing to co-ordinate these groups. Give 
him a ring and let him know what you are 
interested in and he should be able to put you 
in touch with others. 

If you have any ideas or suggestions, speak 
to one of the committee at the meetings or feel 
free to give one of the following people a ring 

Chairman: Mike Reynolds-Jones 773 2849 

Vice-Chairman : Keith Mason 558 7231 

Secretary: Mike Aston 556 6578 

Treasurer: Steve Gould 559 4602 

Keep computing — and let's hear from you. 



STOP PEESE ETGP PRESS... 

Meetings are now weekly but check -firsT as Tfie^e 
are some dates when we can't have the room, 

BUG'S -first software cassette was on sale at 
the MIDLANDS COMPUTES ?AlR where *t ^ac ft 
stand. Available to Tnen-iLerc ir ^ ron-mfmGers at 
a ridiculously low priced}. If you would like a 
copy phone Mike Reynolds-Jones 'for availability • 



AK ;N0fcftt4t%{r 'fiTAfci, CDNifVlEK CWB 





seem i *sw,^y <jse?s . 
■ t* Miixj^Ds'pi^ig^Kflrt;, users' afejf— 

"WufcWIiif feeTns irtctucc.,, ^£f 

50FWA& LlSgftfT/ ! o0* 

Pr%cuNT5 OK 50fTV^£E! *gT 

Ticrft t& ontiiiTlmtft- tap woouNutrt, w£& i\t 

fei ■ ID4L 0*^bfl^(4nTV T3 5MJ*K£ *itjoft 

rtEtir^s E*ey z-sp a*o 41s ^ewv 

OF &W tfotm fm TP£ nflAUSfliGiTu.-IWrAipte*. 
* "Wt Boll £i*i , 3 ;au*i«*ft\ . 

e au. **«s -rastawiwy .~4nt fcrerJ *j awer inter . i*** &£y, •> «te 



ALLTHEFUN 
OF THE AIR 



How do you fancy getting away from 

it all with a trip in our hot air balloon? Jfy-~. , 

Sounds tempting doesn't it. But it takes \^ /^ 
skill and fast reactions to avoid 
all the hazards. 

Are you up to it? 

Could you manoeuvre the balloon 
over the tree lops and mountain 
peaks, while still keeping an eye on 
your ballast and your fuel because 
when it starts to run low youll have 
to descend and not being dist ran ted 
by people throwing stones at you 
land carefully on the fuel pods. 
You'll be lucky to rise back up 
again. But look outf! 

Watch that kite doesn't become 
entangled with you and don't 
worry about that noise its only 
the aeroplanes that come 
diving and swooping at you* 
Youll need to rise higher to 
avoid the turbulance from 
the windmill blades but 
as you do you re likely 
to run into storm clouds and 
bolts of lightening. Also the 
higher you climb in the 
stratosphere the more difficult the 
balloon becomes to handle. 

By now youll start to panic!! and 
wonder now on earth you 1 re going to £ 
make it, but then again that's all the £= 
fun of the ain /-""H 



Prist CoupOil MW Lu 

Pulsar bnflwaie. 15 Mootf'tnld*, Livia-puul LZ ZB(J. 

Please run-h me copies Of Up, Up and flwjy 

Suitable fur Atari 400'SOO ]6K GHMflte fir 5£K (the, 

E'Lease dehit my AcriessyBarclsycaird 
[Delate as nsLKS&sry) 

Card 
S'iiii >IhY 



1 encliise ( henjLie.T.O- f or X_ 

Name 

Arirlrftss 




PSA 



SUPERfiftSTCREDfT CARD SALES LINE- 

051-2366628 24hrs 



£21-95 



Pulsar Software ,15 Moorfields, Liverpool L2 2BQ. 




M 

ATARI 



Ealisto Computers Ltd 



JOHN BRIGHT STREET BIRMINGHAM 021-632 6458 



SPECIAL DISCOUNT 
TO B.U.G MEMBERS 

5XOFF ATARt SOFTWARE 
711 OFF THIRD PARTY SOFTWARE 



iJk 



ATARI 



ATARI 400 with Basic language 

£199.38 

without Basle language £159-99 



ATARI BOO witti Basic language 
4SK £399,99 



ATARI 400 4SK 
INC BASIC £299.99 



ATARI Programmers 

Kil 

£99.99 




PREPPIE 

Tee off on this crazy green. Cross the alligator 
filled river to recover wayward golf balls. In this 
game danger lurks everywhere. With 28 Atari 
colours and super graphics, this game will de- 
light and thrill the gamester. 

Cassette £21 .99 Disc £21 ,$9 




SEA DRAGON 

Prepare to dive in your nuclear armed sub. 
Guide your submarine through a labyrinth of 
passages and past underwater mountains. Try 
to avoid webs of explosive mines that rise from 
the sea bottom. With mine dropping ships 
above, deadly lasers and stalactites, try to reach 
your goal ■ — destruction of the nuclear reactor. 
Will you succeed in this creative game? 

Cassette £25.49 Disc £25.49 




FLOYD OF THE JUNGLE 

This is a Fun game you can play with the family. 
Guide Floyd through the perilous jungle to save 
the lovely Janice, Fully animated with music and 
sound effects. 

Cassette £29,95 Disc £29.95 




HELLCAT ACE 

Air to Air Combat in the Pacific. A full range of 
high-performance aerobatics inc. loops, stalls, 
rolls, Immellman turns and spins. Full 3 dimen- 
sional airspace. Fifteen well documented sce- 
narios. 

Cassette £29.95 Disc £29.9$ 



ZAXXON 

This sensational arcade game of 1 982 is now available For use on 
your home computer system, Fly through a three dimensioned 
liKe playfield to attack the fortress and its deadly armoured Robot, 
Survive this battle and earn the ultimate challenge! 

Cassette £29.99 Disc £29.99 



ATARI 410 Cassette Recorder 
£49.99 



ATA HI 810 

Oi&c Drive with DOS It 
£299.95 



Large range 

of Joysticks 

from E7.00 



UPGRADES 

for ATARI 400 

32K E75.00 4&K £99.95 



ELIMINATOR 

Fans of this game — now it's available for the 
Atari 400 and 300 Pilot your Eliminator Craft 
over alien terrain and fight the hoards of 
marauding enemy ships. Superlative graphics 
and realistic sounds make this arcade style 
game exciting to the end. 

Cassette £1 7.99 Disc £1 7.99 





STRATOS 

This is a kaleidoscope explosion of awesome 
graphics and other-worldly sounds beyond all 
arcade style games. Above futuristic Megopolis 
sweep a wave of alien craft releasing awesome 
weaponry — the terrifying matter ravage rs! With 
your joystick control of the Armageddon wave 
can you destroy them in time? 

Cassette £25.49 Disc £25,49 




CHOPPER RESCUE 

Immerse yourself in non-stop excitement in your 
sleek assault chopper. Features 3 scenarios, 
multiple skill levels and competition in solo or 
team configurations of 1-4 players- 
Cassette £29.95 Disc £29.95 




MINER 20 49ER 

This is the story of Bounty Bob and his intrepid 
attempt to capture Yukon Yohan in the aban- 
doned uranium mine. Duck and dodge your way 
to a high score, but beware of the deadfy mutant 
organisms. 

ROM £29.99 




^.'■'-ifiSffrV-i 



ASTRO CHASE 

Here is the ultimate challenge. Defend the Earth from an awe- 
some attack by aliens. There is no escape- from their force field 
set around our galaxy! They launch their attack vessels and the 
chase begins — avoid, deadly lasers, destroy space mines — 
save the Earth from inevitable doom. 

Cassette £26.50 Disc £26.50 



To; CAUSTO COMPUTERS LTD, 1 19 JOHN BRIGHT STREET, BIRMINGHAM. 
PLEASE ACCEPT MY ORDER FOR THE FOLLOWING PROGRAMS; 

1. , 

2, 

3. ,. 

4, 

5 



Calistc Computers Ltd. 



Despiich to: 



Nam*; 
Address: 



enclosed, 



Cheque No , , , , .for E" 

bi .ik:.™ ™j-, j » mm ,ir. m SPECIALISTS IN MICROCOMPUTERS AND SOFTWARE 

Please debit my cradjt card ACCESS/VISA Nq ■ , 19 J0HN 0RiGhT STREET. BIRMINGHAM B1 1BE 

Phono ondsfs wbIccfue on 021-63Z 645ft. Signed ,,,. TelgphoiHn (E1.BI2 S4EB 



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